(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Constitution and playing rules of the National league of professional base ball clubs"

■i-'-ii-L-V-r-v:: : 

Harry C. PuIKam 



:4.rf. 



Spalding's 
Athletic Library 

Anticipating the present ten- 
dency of the American people 
toward a healthful method of living 
and enjoyment, Spalding's Athletic 
1 .ibrary was established in 1892 for 
the purpose of encouraging ath- 
letics in every form, not only by 
publishing the official rules and 
records pertaining to the various 
pastimes, but also by instructing, 
until to-day Spalding's Athletic 
Library is unique in its own par- 
ticular field and has been conceded 
the greatest educational series on 
athletic and physical training sub- 
jects that has ever been compiled. 
The publication of a distinct 
series of books devoted to athletic 
sports and pastimes and designed 
to occupy the premier place in 
America in its class was an early 
Idea of Mr. A. G. Spalding, who 
was one of the first in America 
to publish a handbook devoted to 
athletic sports, Spalding's Official 
Base Ball Guide being the initial 
number, which was followed at intervals with other handbooks on the 
sports prominent in the '70s. 

Spalding's Athletic Library has had the advice and counsel of Mr. A. G. 
Spalding in all of its undertakings, and particularly in all books devoted 
to the national game. This applies especially to Spalding's Official 
Base Ball Guide and Spalding's Official Base Ball Record, both of which 
receive the personal attention ^l 7 Mr. A. G. Spalding, owing to his early 
connection with the game as the leading pitcher of the champion Boston 
and Chicago teams of 1872-76. His interest does not stop, however, with 
matters pertaining to base ball; there is not a sport that Mr. Spalding 
does not make it his business to become familiar with, and that the 
Library will always maintain its premier place, with Mr. Spalding's able 
counsel at hand, goes without saying. 

The entire series since the issue of the first number has been under 
the direct personal supervision of Mr. James E. Sullivan, President 
of the American Sports Publishing Company, and the total series of 
consecutive numbers reach an aggregate of considerably over three 
hundred, included in which are many "annuals," that really constitute 
the history of their particular sport in America year by year, back copies 
of which are even now eagerly sought fur, constituting as they do the 
really first authentic records of events and official rules that have ever 
been consecutively compile. I. 

When Spalding's Athletic Library was founded, seventeen years ago, 
track ami field athletics were practically unknown outside the larger 
colleffeaand a few athletic clubs In the leading cities, which gave occa- 
sional meets, when an entry list of 2.">0 competitors was a subject of com- 
ment; golf was known only by a comparatively few persons; lawn tennis 
had some vogue and base ball was practically the only established field 




A. G. Spalding 



EDITORS OF SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 

sport, and that In a professional way; basket ball had just been invented; 
athletics for the schoolboy — and schoolgirl— were almost unknown, and 
an advocate of class contests in athletics in the schools could not get a 
hearing. To-day we find the greatest body of athletes in the w 
the Public Schools Athletic League of Greater New York, which has had 
an entry list at its annual games of over two thousand, and in whose 
"elementary series" in base ball last year 106 schools competed for the 
trophy emblematic of the championship. 

While Spalding's Athletic Library cannot claim that the rapid growth 
of athletics in this country is due to It solely, the fact cannot be denied 
that the books have had a great deal to do with its encouragement, by 
printing the official rules and instructions for playing the various games 
at a nominal price, within the reach of everyone, with the sole object 
that its series might be complete and the one place where a person 
could look with absolute certainty for the particular book in which he 
might be interested. 

In selecting the editors and writers for the various books, the lead- 
ing authority in his particular line has been obtained, with the result 
that no collection of books on athletic subjects can compare with 
Spalding's Athletic Library for the prominence of the various authors 
and their ability to present their subjects in a thorough and practical 
manner. 

A short Bketch of a few of those who have edited some of the lead- 
ing numbers of Spalding's Athletic Library is given herewith : 




JAMES E. SULLIVAN 

President American Sports Publishing Com- 
pany; entered the publishing house of Frank 
Leslie in 1878, and. has been connected continu- 
ously with the publishing business since then 
and also as athletic editor of various New 
York papers; was a competing athlete; one of 
the organizers of the Amateur Athletic Union 
of the United States; has been actively on its 
board of governors Kince its organization until 
the present time, and Pre ktari for two suc- 
cessive terms; has attended "very champion- 
ship meetingin America since 1879 and hMoffielated in some opacity to 
connection with American amateur championship*; track and field | 
for nearly twenty-live years; assistant Am< < ' iames. 

Paris. 1900: director Pan- American Exposition athletic department, 1901; 
chief department physical culture i on, St. 

Louis, 1904; secretary American Comrnitt- Athens. 

19%: honorary director of Athletics at Jamestown Expo secre- 

tary American Committee Olyi ! , 

the lastime A.O.. New York: honorary member Missouri A.C.St, Loots; 
honorary member Olympic A . • Idenl Pastime 

A-C.,New Jersey A. C, Knickerbocker AC; president ' 
Association of the A. A. U. for fifto 

a'.'ili • ! "? ue: with " r - Luther H.GoIlcli oraaniiad the Public : 
Atnietic league of New York, and ii now chairman of its games commit- 
tee and mem 1- ,. committee; wa playground work 
and oneof the organizers of the Outdoor Recreation League of New York ; 
appointed by President Roosevelt as special commissioner to the < dympir 
yjames at Athens. 190fi. and decorated by King George I of the li 
iiiV?S? «w his services in connection with the Olympic Games; ap- 
E°.~~ .! P r Scla ! eommuwioner by President Roosevelt to the Olympic 
of £.%£!«? ~? S!i 190 2r •PS " 1 *** 1 let lellan. 1908. as member 
OI u»e Board of Education of Greater Now York. 



EDITORS OF SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 




WALTER CAMP 

For quarter of a century Mr. Walter Camp 
of Yale has occupied a leading position in col- 
lege athletics. It is immaterial what organiza- 
tion is suggested for college athletics, or for 
the betterment of conditions, insofar as college 
athletics is concerned, Mr. Camp has always 
played an important part in its conferences, 
and the great interest in and high plane of 
college sport to-day, are undoubtedly due more 
to Mr. Camp than to any other individual. Mr. 
Camp has probably written more on college 
athletics than any other writer and the leading papers and maga- 
zines of America are always anxious to secure his expert opinion on foot 
ball, track and field athletics, base ball and rowing. Mr. Camp has grown 
up with Yale athletics and is a part of Yale's remarkable athletic system. 
While he has been designated as the ** Father of Foot Ball," it is a well 
known fact that during his college career Mr. Camp was regarded as one 
of the best players that ever represented Yale on the base ball field, so 
when we hear of WalterCamp as a foot ball expert we must also remem- 
ber his remarkable knowledge of the game of base ball, of which he is a 
great admirer. Mr. Camp has edited Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide 
since it was first published, and also the Spalding Athletic Library book 
on How to Play Foot Ball. There is certainly no man in American college 
life better qualified to write for Spalding's Athletic Library than Mr. 
Camp. 



DR. LUTHER HALSEY GULICK 

The leading exponent of physical training 
in America; one who has worked hard to im- 
press the value of physical training in tre 
schools; when physical training was combined 
with education at the St. Louis Exposition in 
1904 Dr. Gulick played an important part in 
that congress; he received several awards for 
his good work and had many honors conferred 
upon him; he is the author of a great many 
books on the subject; it was Dr. Gulick, who, 
acting on the suggestion of James E. Sullivan, 
organized the Public Schools Athletic League of Greater New York, and 
was its first Secretary; Dr. Gulick was also for several years Director of 
Physical Training in the public schools of Greater New York, resigning 
the position to assume the Presidency of the Playground Association of 
America. Dr. Gulick is an authority on all subjects pertaining to phys- 
ical training and the study of the child. 





JOHN B. FOSTER 

Successor to tho late Henry Chadwick 
("Father of Base Ball") as editor of Spald- 
ing's Official Bats Ball Guide; sporting editor 
of the New York Evening Telegram; has 
been in the newspaper business for many 
years and is recognized throughout America 
as a leading writer on the national game; a 
staunch supporter of organized base bail, 
hia pen has always been used for the better- 4 
ment of the game. 



EDITORS OF SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 




TIM MURNANE 

Base Hall editor of the Boston Globe and 
President of Die New England League of 
Base Ball * 

ball men of the country; known from coast 
to coast; is a keen follower of the frame and 
prominent in all Ita councils; nearly ball a 
century 820 was one of America's foremost 
players; knows the pamo thoroughly and 
writes from ih.: point of view both of player 
and an otlkiul. 




HARRY PHILIP BURCHELL 

Sporting editor of the New York Times; 
graduate of the University of Pennsylvania; 
editor of Spalding's Official Lawn Tennis 
Annual; is an authority on the game; follows 
the movements of the players minutely and 
l not only tennis but all other sub- 
that can be classed as athletics; no 
is better qualified to edit this book than Mr. 
Burchell. 



GEORGE T. HEPBRON 

Former Young Men's Christian Association 
director; fur many years an official of the 
Athletic league of Young Men's Christian 
Associations of North America; was con- 
nected with Dr. Lather H. Gulick in V 
Men's Christian Association work for i 
twelve years; bee lied with basket 

ball when it was in its infancy ami has fol- 
lowed it since, being recognized as the lead- 
ing exponent of the official rules; sue-' 
Dr. Gulick as editor of the Official Basket Ball 

Guide and also editor of the Spalding Athletic Library book on J i 

Play Basket BftXL 





JAMES S. MITCHEL 

Forrm-r champ .older 

of numerous records, and ii tie winner of 

■ individual 
in the j Mr. Mitchel is a close 

student of athletics and well qualified to write 
upon any topic connected with athletic sport; 
has been for years on the staff of the New 
York Sun. 



EDITORS OF STALO/NG'S ATHLETIC LIRRAh'Y 



MICHAEL C. MURPHY 

The world's most famous athletic trainer: 
the champion athletes that he has developed 
for brack and field sports, tool ball and base pall 

fields, would run into thousands; he became 
famous when at Yale University and has 
been particularly successful in developing 
what might be termed championship teams; 
his rare good judgment has placed him in an 
enviable position in the athletic world; now 
with the University of Pennsylvania ; dur- 
ing his career has trained only at two col- 
leges and one athletic club, Yale and the 
University of Pennsylvania and Detroit Athletic Club; his most recent 
triumph was that of training the famous American team of athletes 
that swept the held at the Olympic Games of 1908 at London. 





DR. C. WARD CRAMPTON 

Succeeded Dr. Gulicfe as director of physical 
training in the schools of Greater New York: 
as secretary of the Public Schools Athletic 
League is at the head of the most remarkable 
Organization of its kind in the world; is a 
practical athlete and gymnast himself, and 
has been for years connected with the physi- 
cal training system in the schools of Greater 
New York, having had charge of the High 
School of Commerce. 




DR. GEORGE J. FISHER 

Has been connected with Y. M. C. A. work 
for many years as physical director at Cincin- 
nati and Brooklyn, where he made such a high 
reputation as organizer that he was chosen to 
ted l»r. Luther H. Gulick as Secretary of 
the Athletic League of Y. M. C. A.'* of North 
America, when the latter resigned to 
charge or the physics] training in the Public 
Schools of Greater New York. 



DR. GEORGE ORTON 

On athletics, coll- , particularly 

hall, soccer foot ball, and 
training of the youth, it would be hard to find 
er qualified than Dr. Or ton; has bad 
1 1 1 r • 1 1 . cessary athletic experience and the 
ability to impart that experience intelligently 
to the youth of the land: for years was the 
American, British and Canadian champion 
runner. 



EDITORS OF SPALDING'S ATHLETIC I.WRARY 








FREDERICK R. TOOMBS 

A well known authority on skating-, rowing, 
boxing-, racquets, and other athletic sports: 
was sporting editor of American Press Asso- 
ciation, New York; dramatic editor; is a law- 
yer and has served several terms as a member 
of Assembly of the legislature of the State of 
New York; ha3 written several novels and 
historical works. 



R. L. WELCH 

A resident of Chicago; the popularity of 
indoor base ball is chiefly due to his efforts; 
a player himself of no mean ability; a first- 
ettH organizer; he has followed the game of 
indoor base ball from its inception. 



DR. HENRY S. ANDERSON 

Has been connected with Yale University 
for years and is a recognized authority on 
gymnastics; is admitted to be one of the lead- 
ing authorities in America on gymnastic sub- 
jects; is the author of many books on physical 
training-. 



CHARLES M. DANIELS 

Just the man to write an authoritative 
book on swimmings; the fastest Rwimmer the 
world has ever known; BMtnbex New York 
Athletic Club swimming team and an Olym- 
pic champion at Athens in 1906 and l-on.jon. 
In his book on Swimming. Champion 
baniels describes ju.-.t the methods one must 
use to become an expert swimmer. 

GUSTAVE BOJUS 

Mr. Itojus is most thoroughly qualified to 
write intelligently on all BUD lining 

to gymnastics and athletics; m hu day one 

of Arneriea's moat famous amateur ail 

'!i[.«-ted successfully in gymnastics and 
many other sports for the New York Turn 

ty years he has 1 
inent in beaching; gymnastics and athl- 
was i for the famous gymnastic 

championship teams of Columbia University; 
now with the Jersey City high schools. 



EDITORS OF SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY 








CHARLES JACOBUS 

Admitted to be the "Father of Roque;" 
one of America's most expert players, win- 
ning" the Olympic Championship at St. Louis 
in 1904; an ardent supporter of the BUM 
and follows it minutely, and much of the 
success of roque is due to his untiring effoxi ■; 
certainly there is no one better qualified to 
write on this subject than Mr. Jacobus 



DR. E. B. WARMAN 

Well known as a physical training expert; 
was probably one of the first to enter the feld 
and is the author of many books on the sub- 
ject; lectures extensively each year all over 
the country. 



W. J. CROMIE 

Now with the University of Pennsylvania; 
was formerly a Y. M. C. A. physical director; 
a keen student of all gymnastic matters; the 
author of many books on subjects pertaining; 
to physical training. 



G. M. MARTIN 

By profession a physical director of the 
Young" Men's Christian Association; a close 
student of all things gymnastic, and games 
for the classes in the gymnasium or clubs. 



PROF. SENAC 

A leader in the fencing" world ; has main- 
tained a fencing school in New York for 
years and developed a great many cham- 
pions; understands the science of fencing 
thoroughly and the benefits to be derived 
therefrom. 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 

Qi Giving the Titles o! all Spalding Athletic Library Books now f~) 
V' ^ in print, grouped for ready relerence ■*/ 



=«= 



Jr 



SPALDING OFFICIAL ANNUALS 



No. I 

No. IA 

No. 2 

No. 2A 

No. 3 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No 



No. IO 
No. 12 



Spalding 

Spalding' 

Spalding' 

Spalding 

Spalding' 

Spalding 

Spalding 

Spalding 

Spalding 

Spalding 

Spalding 

Spalding 

Spalding 



Official 

Official 

Official 

Official 

Official 

Official 

Official 

Official 

Official 

's Official 

s Official 

s Official 

's Official 



Group I. Base Ball 

No. 1 Spalding's Official Base Ball 

No. 202 How to Hay Base Ball. 

No. 22:: How to Bat 

No. 2:!2 Ik. .v i.j Kim Bases. 

i How to Pitch. 
No. 229 How to O 
No. 225 How to Play First Base. 
No. 226 How to Play Second Iia.iL-. 
No. 227 How to Play Third Base. 
No. 22H How to Play Shortstop. 
No. 224 How to P. I Lid. 

How to Organize a Ba le Pall 

Club. [I.. 

How to Organize a Baea Ball 
How to Manage a Base Ball 

Club. 
How toT rain allaseRallTeam 
How to ' I EaM Ball 

HowtoUmpirea f Sarin-. [ 'IVarn 

i Bai a Ball ] 
Ready Reckoner of Base Ball 
Percentages. 
BASK P.M. I. AUXILIARIES 
No. IA Official l: old. 

'Minor LeagueBaseBallGuide 
No. 320. 'Official BookNatkraalL 

of Prof. Pa -,• Pall Clubs. 
No. 306 Official Handbook N 
• r. ,,, . , Playground Ball Assn. 
bed in April, lso». 

Croup ii. foot Ball 

No. 2 Spalding's Official Foot Ball 

On 
No. ?,\r, How to Play Foot Ball. 
No. 2a ,rFool 

No. 2«(j How to Play Soccer. 



No. 
231. 



No. 219. 



Group IV. 



No. 



Base Ball Cuide 

Base Ball Record 

Foot Ball Cuide 

Soccer Foot Ball Cuide 

Cricket Cuide 

Lawn Tennis Annual 

Coif Cuide 

Ice Hockey Cuide 

Basket Ball Cuide 

Bowling Cuide 

Indoor Base Ball Cuide 

Roller Polo Cuide 

Athletic Almanac 

FOOT BALL AUXILIARY 

No. 303 Spalding's Official Canadian 

Foot Ball Guide. 

Group ill. Cricket 

No. :i SpaUHng'BQfficialOrickttGuidt. 

No. 277 Crick. I and How to Play It, 

lawn Tennis 

-1 Spaldvng's Official Lawn Tvn - 
ilia A> 

How to Play Lawn Tennis. 
No. 279 Strokes and Science of Lawn 

Ten i 

Group v. dull 

No. 5 Spolding'sOffieialGoU'Ovids, 

No. 276 How to Play Coif. 

Group VI. Hocken 

No. 6 Sinihlinii'sOfficial Ice Hockey 

■>•'. 
No. 301 How to Play Ice Hockey. 

I Ki.l.l llm-key. 
n Hockey. 

'No. 18K- Parlor Hockey. 

■ ■■-. Hockey. 
No. 180 Ring Hockey. 

HOCKEY AUXILIARY 
No. 256 Official Handbook Ontario 

i.ey Association. 

Group VII. Basket Ball 

No. 7 Spalding's Official Basket Ball 

No. 198 ll.,w to Play Basket Ball. 

Let Ball Guide for Women. 

IKET BALL AUXILIARY 
No. 312 Official Collegia' 
l»ok. 



ANV OF THE ABOVE BOOKS MAILED POSTPAID UPON RECEIPT OF 10 CENTS 



^ 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



£T 



Group VIII. 



Howling 



No. 8 Spaldino's Official Bowling 

Group IX. '' Indoor Base Ball 

No. 9 S i nil d inns O.tlicial Indoor 
Base Ball Guide. 

croup X. Polo 

No. 10 Spalding's Official Roller Polo 

(ill/'/'-. 

No. 129 Water Polo. 
No. 199 Equestrian Polo. 

Group XI. Miscellaneous Games 

No. 201 Lacrosse. 

No. 305 Official Handbook U. S. Inter- 
collegiate Lacrosse Leagua. 
No. 2 IS Archery. 
No. 138 Croquet. 
No. 271 Roque. 

(Racquets. 
No. 194 ■< Squash-Racquets. 

(Court Tennis. 
No. 13 Hand Ball. 
No. 167 Quoits. 
No. 170 Push Ball. 
No. 14 Curling. 
No. 207 Lawn Bowls. 
No. 188 Lawn Games. 
No. 189 Children's Games. 

Group XII. Nineties 

No. 12 Spalding's Official Athletic 
Almanac. 
College Athletics. 
All Around Athletics. 
Athletes' Guide. 
Athletic Primer. 
Olympic GamesatAthens.1906 
How to Sprint. 
How to Run 100 Yards. 
Distance and Cross Country 
Running. [Thrower. 

How to Become a Weight 
Official Sporting Rules. I boys. 
Athletic Training for School- 
ATIILETIC AUXILIARIES 
No. 311 Amateur Athletic Union Offi- 
cial Handbook. [book. 
Intercollegiate Official Hand- 
Y. M. C. A. Official Handbook. 
Public Schools Athletic 
League Official Handbook. 
No. 314 Public Schools Athletic 
League Official Handbook 
—Girls' Branch. 
No. 316 Intercollegiate Cross Country 

Association Handbook. 
No. 308 Official Handbook New York 
Intcrscholastic Athletic 
Association. 
No. 317 Marathon Running. 



No. 27 
No. 182 
No. 156 
No. 87 
No. 273 
No. 252 
No. 255 
No. 174 

No. 259 
No. 55 
No. 246 



No. 307 
No. 302 
No. 313 



Group XIII. 



Athletic 
Accomplishments 



No. 177 How to Swim. 

Nn. 2'.ni Speed Swimming. 

No. 128 Bkvw I" How. 

No. 209 How to Become a Skater. 

No. ITS How to Train for Bicycling. 

No. 23 Canoeing. 

No. 282 Roller Skating Guide. 



Group 

No. IS 
No. 162 
No. 166 
No. 140 
No. 236 
No. 102 
No. 233 
No. 166 
No. 200 
No. 143 
No. 262 
No. 29 
No. 191 
No. 2S9 



XIV. 



Manly Sports 



Fencing;. ( By Breck.) ■ ' 

Boxing. 

Fencing. ( By Senac.) 

Wrestling. 

How to Wrestle. 

Ground Tumbling. 

Jiu Jitsu. 

How to Swing Indian Clubs. 

: I Bell Exeiv 
Indian Clubs and Dumb Bells. 
Medicine Ball Exercises. 
Pulley Weight Exercises. 
How to Punch the Bag. . 
Tumbling for Amateurs. 



Group XV. 



Gymnastics 



No. 104 Grading of Gymnastic Exer- 
cises. 
No. 214 Graded Calisthenics and 
Dumb Bell Drills. 
Barajum Bar Bell Drill. 
Indoor and Outdoor Gym- 
nastic Games. 
How to Become a Gymnast. 
Fancy Dumb Bell and March- 
ing Drills. 



No. 254 

No. 158 



No. 124 
No. 287 



Group XVI. 



Physical Culture 



No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

No. 



208 



Ten Minutes' Exercise for 
Busy Men. 

Physical Education and Hy- 
giene. 

Scientific Physical Training 
and Care of the Body. 

Physical Training Simplified. 

Hints on Health. 

288 Health Answers. 

Muscle Building. 

School Tactics and Maze Run- 
ning. 

Tensing Exercises. 

Health by Muscular Gym- 
nastics. 

Indigestion Treated by Gym- 
nastics. 

Gel Well: Keep Well. 



ANY OF THE ABOVE BOOKS MAILED POSTPAID UPON RECEIPT OF 10 CENTS 



-*, 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



Group I. Base Ball 



.. I-M'M.lli.i;'- 
Base Ball «...|.le. 



<>ni'-i>i 



The lesdinc B*a* 11*11 

mual of the country, and 

i * official authority of 

Urn (jmt. Contain* th* 

official play in*- rule*, with 

an explanatory index of the 

rule* compiled by Mr. A. G. 

Spalding-; pictures of all 

the teamii in the National, 

American and minor league* ; r«- 

• of the season; rolleirn Base Hull. 



No. 2(12-11 =» to Play Bil* 
Bull. 

Editad by Tim Humane. New and 
revised edition. Illustrated with pic- 
ture*. « how In* how all tha various 
curve* and drop* arc thrown and por- 
traitaof leading pfayera. Prie* 10 cent*. 
No. 22.1— llorv to Bat. 

There i* no better way of beeorninc 
a proncient batter than by raadinc thia 
book and practising the direction*. 
Numerous illustration*. I'rica lOcents. 

\o. 233— How to Ho* the 
Base*. 

Thia book ci»e* clear and eonciaa 
diracuona for excelling aa a baac run- 
ner; tali* when to run and when not to 
do *o; how anrf when to alkie: team 
work on the ban a; to fact, every point 
of the cam* i* thoroachly explained. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cent*. 

No. 23i>— Hon to i-ii.i. 

Anew, up-to-date bonk lis contents 
are the practical teaching of men who 
have reached the top aa pitcher*, and 
who know how to Impart a knowledge 
of their art. All the but leagues' 
pitcher* are shown. Price 10 cent*. 
No. 220— How to Catch. 

Every boy who ha* hopes of being a 
cleter eateher should read how well- 
known player* coyer their position. 
P^tore* of all the noted catcher* In 
«kt big league*, price 10 cent. 

Ao. 22.1— How to flay Fire I 

MM, 
Illustrated with picture* of alt the 
prominent nr*t basemen. Price lOcenta. 
Ao.22ft-.How to Play *e<-cnd 



Th* Idea* of UmU 



V(j -:ir>— Beady Hcckoncr of 
Base Ball Percentage*. 

To supply a demand for a book which 
would show the percent**-? of clubs 
without recouraeCothearduouaworkof 
figu ring, the publisher* had these tables 
compilcd by an expert. Price 10 cent*. 
niSK BALL Al tll.l tlUKI. 
No. I \ — V|>alillnu'n cirtl.l.il 
Base Ball Hroor.l. 

Something new In Base Ball. Con- 
tains records of all kind* from the be- 
Iff lining of the National l-eacuc and 
official aversgra of all professional or- 
ganization* for past season. 10 cent*. 
So. -Ills- *tln..r League Baa* 
11*11 Gold*. 

The minora' own guide. Edited by 
President T. H. Humane. *f the New 
England League. Price 10 cent*. 

No. 320— Official Handbook 
of th'- National l.rsiur 
Of Pr atonal Baae Ball 

Club 

Contain -»• Constitution. By Laws 
Official Rules, Average*, and schedule 
of the National l,rac-j« for the current 
year, together with list of club officers 
and reports of the annual meettnfs of 
the League, price 10 cants. 
No. IIOA— Official Handbook 
National rl» > ground Ball 
Aaaorlntlnn. 

This came Is specially sdspted for 
playrrounda, parks, etc. Is spread in r 
rapidly The book contains ■ descrip- 
tion of the e-*me, r» '•* and officer* 
PrtcolOc*!..* 

Group II. Foot Ball 

Bclal 

Editad by Walter Camp. 
jContuns th* new rules. 

■ with diagram of ft*ld: All- 
I America teams a* selected 
| by the leading authorities; 

view* of the rame from 
iriou* tecttons of th* 

■ country; scores, pictures. 
' Price 10 cent*. 



to Play Foot 



hsrabeen Incorporated In thi* book 
the especial beneflt of boys who want i 
to know the fine point* of play at thi* I 
aotntof thedkunond. Price 10 cent*. 



Third baa* is. In some r**p*ct*. th. 
•am* Important of the infield. All the 
point* explained. Prtc* 10 cent" 

*":'f£2r i *" n *° **•* ■■•■■•- 

anorutop Is on* f lh , hardsat poai- 
Uoason the Infield to nlLasT qVkk 

for a pUrer who esp^-ts io nJkTT-^ 

aa a .S-.rUtnp. | 



No. Nin— ||o 
Ball. 

Killed by WsJter Camp, of Yak. 
Everything lh»t a beginner wtMts to 
know and many point* that an expert 
will be glad to team. Snapshot* of 
leading teams and player* In action. 
wtlh comment* by Waller Camp. 
Priot 10 cents, 

\., .'T-apaldlnat'e Official 

* |filt„i, lurfft !••'.( 

Bnll i.itlde. 
A complete snd up-Io- 
date guide to the 'Soccer' 
Kama in the United States 

nms, official 



l**a, *--.! 
news fnan all parte of the 
..nm*JTf Illustrated IVice 1 
10 con U. 



Group III. Cricket 



The most complete y*ar 
book of the cam* thai has 
ever been published in 
America. Report* of 
special matches, official 
rules and pictures of sll 
the leading teams. Price 
10 cents. 



By Prince Ranjiuinhji. The cams 
describe"! concisely and illustrated with 
full-pace pictures posed especially for 
thia book. Price lucent*. 




Group IV. 



Lawn 
Tennis 



v.. 



4— Spalding'* 
l.awn Tennis An 



BS4— How 



o Play the 

■ 



Ontfleld. 

An Invaluable fiu!* f, 
sauder. Pri**l0-- 

** to* 8 * 1 r!?. 7 •» '/'-'-i «»w 

"> S.Tr.n, „ 



tUm eacht.o,.,*. .,,,;., k, ,:..,-i 
rritun by the best player In Kfurtsnd 



•o »•.,! 



i . r . •• ■«-■■*» : i un 

nlcal Terns, .t »«.. *,.„ 
A-es-falMida Prk» W o-.u. 



b*ay*rs in action Price W cent*, 
"".i *AI . U Kll Hi.,. , 
i " l ". s '-''"t..a - Offici.i 
!."Vde K "** 1 '*•" 

^fc Priosu coats. ■—•■■«». 



B. 
! 
tl 




Official 

aTflwnli 
Con ten La incl ode reports 
of all bnnortaai tourna- 
menU; officisl rankinc 
from 18W>todate; lawsof 
lawn tennis; instructions 
for hand i cap pt nc; deci- 
bJobbi sbj itmStfw i- ,).'■ 

manscement of tonms- 

menu; directory of clubs; 

Uymc out and keeplnc s court. Illus- 
trated. Price 10 cent*. 

». 107— How lo Play tana 

Trnnis. 
A complete dsoertptlon of lawn ten- 
nis; a lesson for beainnera snd direc- 
tions ullinc how to make the most im- 
portant *trok*a. Illustrated, Prieo 
10 osnta. 

No. 2?0— Stroke* and ndeace 
Of I nn.i irnnli. 

By P. A. Vail*, a UarBrw aothority 
<m the came In Great BrUsin. Every 
stroke In the cam* >* areurstely illus- 
trated and analysed by taw author. 
Prica 10 cent*. 

Group V. 

"»... .*,_ *>paldln*i'* 

<---lf 6 c. 

Contain* r- 

Important Innmsm—ils 

ayfictss OB the came in 

on* of the 

• '. ; 

Inenl pLsyers. ofnciajplay- 

C rule* and csnera) 

nns of interest. Price 

o. 270— How to Play Uolf. 

By James Braid and Harry Vardon. 
<e world a two createst plsyera tell 
iw they play tt^ came, with numer- 
f ull.p*c* pietupe* of thssa taken 
th* links. PrW* 10 cents. 



Group VI. Hockey 

■ rial lee 



Golf 



1 



SI 



The nffidaJ rear book af 

• asas**. OMwaM !».» 

sTWial rolse. picture* of 

-a-hreue^.sr-1,1.,.,. 

■erord*. review of the 

. sepoet* frosn dif. 

Section* of the 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



NO. 3114— IlOW lO 1'lr.r If«- 

llllllf). 

Contain* * description of the duties 
of each player. Jllumrated. Price 10 
cento. 

Mo. I St— Field) Hockey. 

Prominent In the iporU at Vaa.-i.ir. 
Smith. Wellenlry, Uryu Muwr and Other 

leading colleges. Price 10 cents. 
No. INN- I. « iv n Hockey. 

I'nrli.r II<m iliey, I.iinl, ., 

Il..-'i. i -i . 
Containing the rules for each gum*. 
Itluatrstod. Price 10 cents. 

No. 1NO— It in ir ii.M-l.rr. 



Ilul K.KV AUXILIARY. 
No. 2.1U— OIIIcInI Handbook 
ol til* Ontario Hooker 
Association. 

Contain* the official rules of the 
Association, constitution, rule* of com- 
petition, lilt of officers, anit pictures of 
leading player*. 1'rice 10 cents. 



Basket 
Group VII. Ball 

NO. 7— SpftlfllnfcT's "ttlfint 

Rnakct Hnll Guide, 

Edited by Goorgo T. 
Hnpbron. Contofno the 
revised official mica. de- 
cisions on dinpui- d 
rfffirili «f prominent 
teams, reports on the gnme 
from various parta of the 
country. Illustrated. Price | 
10 cento. 

No. 11)3— Hon fo Pl«y Da* lie* 
Ball. 

By G. T. Hepbron. editor of the 
Official llaskel Ball Guide. Illustrated 
with scene* of action. I'ricc 10 cents. 

NO. 3U*-Oflli-lnl BuIm, Hull 
Gnfile for Wonn'ii. 
Edited by Ml** Sendo Berenaon. of 
Smith Cotlcg*. flontains the official 
playing rulca and special ... 
the gam* by prominent authorities. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cent*. 

ItASKKT MALI. Al XII.IAHV. 
No. 312— t'ollraUte Ilnsket 
nail llmiilt-ook. 

■1 ,„ ,,■?.. , ,; ,,, i :-. 
Kiitle H*«k«t Hull AsaxdaUon. I pD 
taina the official mien. record*. Alt- 
America selections, reviews, nnd pic- 
tures. Kdtt«d by H. A. Fisher, of 
Price 10 cents. 




Group VIII. Bowling 

ft— HpnMlfKC'a OHlelnl 
rvllnR Ovfito. 

Th* content* Include: 
diagram* of effective ile- 
livsrtes: hint* to beirin- 
nera how to score; official 
role*; spare*, h«w they 
are mode; rulosforrocked 
hat. QUtnurt. cocked hat 
and feather, battle Kama. 
M. rtteUSMM. 




rTllUL »- *— Indoor 
Group DC. Base Ball 

No. 0— SpnMlnu- 
<loor Ruae Hnll 

America'* national frame 
is now vieing with other 
indoor game* a* a winter 
pastime. Thi* book con- 
tafna the play in g rule*, 
picture* of leading t««ms. 
and interesting articles on 
the Rome by leading au- 
thorities on the subject. 
Price 10 cento. 




Group X. 



Polo 




No. Ill— S|ifil.li,t K 'a 
Onlelnl Holler 

l'olo Guide. 

Edited by J. C. Morse 
A full dencription of the 
game; official rules, re- 
cords: pictures of promi- 
nent players. Price 1C cent* I 

So. 12I>— Waiter Polo. 

The content* of this hook treat of 
every detail, the Individual work of the 
players, the prnctn-e 'if the team, how 
to Ihrow the ball, with illuiitratior.il and 
many valuable hints, pries 10 cents. 

No. 11>(»— &<!iie*lrlan l'olo. 

Compiled l.y II. I.. Pitzpatrick of the 
New York 0UD. Illustrated with pay, 
trail* >>f lending playcru, and contain* 
moat u.ieful Information for i»ilu play- 
CM. Price 10 cunt*. 



GroupXI. ousGames 

No. 2111— l.ncroaae. 

Every position is thoroughly ex- 
plained in a nio«t simple and concin* 

■nanner. rendering it the he.it manual 
of the rame ever published. Illus- 
trated with numerous snapshots of im- 
portant plays. Price 10 cento. 

X«>. 311.-.- Olfl.lnl UniMlUonk 

I . s. lm< . -i oil. -ulalc l.n- 

crornir i ■ -ague, 

Contains the constitution, by-laws, 

playing rules, liat of officers and records 

of the Association. Price 10 cents. 

No. -JTI— Spultllnu's <Hti.iL I 
It o<| hi' Guide. 

The official publication of the No- 
tion*! Iti-iue Association of America. 
Contains a dencription of the courts 

;mi( their i-otvl me! inn, dlnarum*. id" - 
t rat ion*, rules and valuable informa- 
tion. Price 1(1 rctilfl. 

No. i:is_«4,)nldlna:'i» Official 

* i 'Hi in I I. i. ilt . 

Contslm directions for playing, die- 
Itramsof Important strokes. description 
of fTTOUnds. instructions for the Wsm- 
nir, terms used in the icnme. and the 
official playttift* ruleo. Price 10 cents- 
No. SIS— Archery. 

A new and up-to-date book an this 
fascinating pantime. The several 
varieties of archery; Instrnctlonn for 
shooting; how to select implements; 
MTore; and arrest deal of jute 



nla. 

How to ploy each came i* thorougldy 
explained, and all the difficult utrnkea 
.-.tiitM'ii l.y siwcial phut'igrardia taken 
oapacially for this book. Oniuina the 
uih.'i.il rules for each some. Price 10 
cents. 

No. KIT— (tnolts. 

Qpotalni a description of the ptsya 
used hyexiiertn and the official rules. 
Illustrated. Price 10 cento. 

No. 1711— I'o-li Hnll. 

This book contains the official rules 
and a sketch of the riunc. illiistrated„ 
PllCsi 10 cents. 

No. 13— How lo F| N y flftnd) 
Hnll. 

By the world's champion. Michael 
,**"' , *'*«■» "'"y '» thoroughly ex- 
plained by text and diagram, llluav 
trsted. Price 10 cents. 

No. 1 1— ( orlltitt. 

A short history of this famous Scot- 
tiah psdtirne. with instructions for 
play, rule* of the game, definitions of 
terma and diagram* of different soots. 
Price 10 cents. 



. 207-notvllnic nn the, 
Qr««m or. I.nnn Howls. 



How to construct a green; how to 
play the game, and the official rules 
of thrt 8cottir.ii Howling Asaoeiolion. 
I II uitra t.tl. Price 10 cents. 
No. 180— Children's Onrnfa. 

These rsmes are Intended for use at 
recesses, and all but the team games 
have been adapted to large classes. 
Suitable fur children from three to 
eight years, ami include a great variety. 
Price lu centa. 

No. IMS— I.ftivn Gnnies. 

Lawn Hockey. Garden Hockey. Hand 
Tennis. Tether Tennis; also Volley 
Hall. Parlor Hotktr. Badminton Bas- 
ket Goal. Price 10 cents. 

Group XB. Athletics 



oittriftl 




Compiled by J. K. SuliU | 

■ I ->f the Ami 

1 

only annual publlcatiot 
now Issued that contain, 
a complete list of amaieti; 

i --v.ru 

ntlnf. in terse holastic, Irish, McoUii 

' -ntinenul. .South African. 
AuiitraUnian; numerous photos of in- 

rid h.i'lmgttthletie. 

teams. Price 10 cents.. 

No. 27— Colleire Allilellca. 

M. C. Murphy, the welt-known ath- 

. r. now with Psnneylvsnlftj 

the author of this book, has written It 

especially for the scln-oUmy and caller* 

BUn, bOtll hi mvalluhlefurtheathletS. 

whowiahe* t» excel in any branch of 

pOTtJ prufusely ll hi- 1 rated. 

Met in i:.-n' .. .1 



Ni. 



1- I.. 



IN2— AII-Aronn<l At*- 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



IDo. lliit— Athletes 



ulilr 



Full instruc I'otia for the beginner, 

telling huw to •prinl, hurdle, jump ami 
throw weight*, g.'i" ml hint* on train- 
ing; valuable advice (•> btffti 

Important A. A. 11. ml. i an. I ti,, ir •■*- 
planaltons, while tin- pirture* comprise 
many leWIW of champion* in action. 
Price 10 cent*. 

No. 27^— The Olympic Carac- 
al .Ml.. Ml 

A complete account of the Olympic 
Hnmesuf 1906, at Athens, the greatest 
International Athh-tir Content but 
held. Compiled by J. K. Sullivan. 
Spuria] Unlt«d States Coromisii.uier to 
the Olympic Games. Price 10 cents. 

Wo. HT— Athletic Primer. 

Edited by J. B, Sullivan. President 
nf the Amateur A-! 
how to organize an athletic club, how 
to conduct on athletic meeting, and 
gives rule* for the government of »th- 
l*tie meetings; content! alw> Include 
direc tion* for laying out athletic 
groundr, and a very insirurtlve article 
on training. Price 10 cent*. 

Ho. — Bin to *pr!nt. 

Every athlete who aspire* to be a 
■printer can ntudy thla book to advan- 
tage. Price 10 cento. 



No. 2K3— Iloer to linn 100 

Vanlt. 

By J. W. Morton, the noted British 
champion. Many nT Mr. Morton's 
methods of training are novel to 
American athlete*, hot his WltCfl ia 
the hem tribute to their worth. Illus- 
trated. Price 10 cent*. 

Wo. 171— llinlnnrr mid (roll- 
Country Itonoltifi. 

By Ceorge Orton, the famous Tlni- 
eerslty of Pennsylvania nil 

quarter, half. mile, the I 
lance*, and crona-country running and 
•t«-i.l-rii;«.i"iir, with la trvcUons for 
Iraininr ; , : athlete* 

In action, with comments by the editor 
Price 10 cento. 

Ko. 350— Weight Tl,r...ilne. 

Probably Mtteno. I 
has bad the varied and lone ■■— ihliiai 

■' 
weight throwing departm- 

.!.lelniur- 
nml. of i nol 

■ 

No. Sin— Athletic Trnli.lttL 
fur S'-Im>h|I>o>*. 

' t* treated 
of separately. Price 10 centa. 

So 



G.1 — Offlilal 
Rolra. 



■ porting 



Contain* rules not found hi aih«* 
puMlcaUona f-.r the g-r.t-mnui7i ,.r 

many ni-.rU, rule* for vmll . 
lhufflebnard. — i - wsfcjiaiiHS, ^23_Z 

r»r,r,r. piiM wi ! 



..... i . i --■■ r j.,,., , 



A'lin.Ki ir At KIMAHfaWi 
So. 3tl — OHIolnl Handbook 
of the A.A.U. 

The A. A. U. is the governing body 
of athletes in the United Slates of 
America, and all gomes mil 
under its rules, which aru exclusively 
published in this handbook, SI 
should be in the hands of every athlete 

. club officer In 
Also includes a very intere.i'" . 
on "ih.- Growth of Amorksu AUi- 

lelic"," and a sh..rt In '....■ "J '-■"'■ 

f thi Hoard of Governors. 
Price 10 centa. 

No. 3(17— Official Inlerrnlle- 
Blritc A. A. A. A. Hiin.lh.niU. 
ClWhrint constitution, by-law*, and 
Iswaof athletics; records from 1870 to 
-lute. Price 10 cent*. 
So. .1«X— Official Handbook 
New Tnrk Inlcrachol- 
i.-li.- A 1 1. 1. 1 1.* Associa- 
tion. 

• the Asaoeistlon's records. 
constitution and by-laws and other 
Information. Price 10 rer.n. 



Contains the official rules governing 
■11 sports under the Jurisdiction of the 
Y. M. C A., official Y. M. C. A. scoring 
table*, iwnta'.hl.in rules, pictures of 
V. M. C A athlete*. Price 
10 cents. 

He, :ti:t_omciiii ii«>..ii.....u 
of ii.< I'nhllc Icho.ta 

Athletic Lnimir. 

rMit.-.i bi Dr. botbn tuirey c.ulirk. 

director of physical education In the 
New York pabbc wi»«.lx HI initiated. 
Prii-e Ifl fpnl-i. 

Mo. :ti t— rih*i<*ini H.111.11..M.L 

Clrln* llr.n..h n f (he 
PttMIC -School- Athletic 

l.rnKOr. 

The officio! publication. Contain*: 

conatitution and by-laws, |i«t of ofll- 

ora, founder*, life anil annual 

members, rrporta and lltustrstiona. 

Price 10 cents. 

No. .till— Intcrco llriUIr 
(>..». t •iiinlry llnnitloitiU. 
Contairi i t.y.Uwa, 

list of onVera, and records of the asso- 
ciation. Price 10 rents. 
It*. ::i7 — >lnri.tli'io lluanlnr. 
A new ami up-to-date book on Ihi* 
i .-lime. Contain* pictures 
• if tna !*• «1 ir.*: Msrsthon ronner*. 
method* of trsimnr. and lir«t times 
made in vaiious Marathon tt. in. 
Price 10 cents. 

Group XIII. Athletic 
Accomplishments 

1". 177-llorv (d *"Ih.. 

the novice, the II lustra lion r - 

■ . ■ 

•howlna the awimmer In clear water: 
a ▼sluable feattlf* la the aerie* of 
Isntldnll " exercUca for the bewinner. 
Prim 10 cento. 
\... IM Mm to r ow . 

W*» York 
''a most 

the nnUh of the ,i,„,e and other valu- 
•bUlnfwnssUon. Prko 10 canto. 



No. l!!Kt— Speed Snliiinilnll. 

By Champion C. M. 1/snirla of th* 
M«w Vorfc AthMtk Club team, hokler 
...rccordn.sndthe 
lllllissll in Amcrli-a qualified to 

..|.jr..t. At. v t-.y should 

, increase hia apeed In ths 

water after readmit Champion OnnielV 

MM on the aubieet. Pries 10 

No. 33— Canoelnp;. 

I'HddlliiK. sailing:, cruiiinr and rac- 

iu.I tin ir unei<: with hints 

i. rlt UKl maiiairement: the choice of 

aanOf- funlins-mnoeg, racine renuhf 

T,.ms: eanoesne «nd campln«. Tuily 

illustrated. Price 10 cents. 

No. 2HO— How to Ilecomet • 

SLnler. 
Contains advice for beg-in ner*; how 
to become a fioTire skater, ahowina how 
to do all the different tricks of the beat 
(Wire skaters. Picture* of prominent 
skateraandnainerouidlawTTatns. Price 
10 cents. 

So. i— i:-<>ftl<-lnl Roller 
<-!. ittinu l.ul.Ie. 
Direclions for becoming s fsney and 
- r kutcr. and role* f 
akatlnt*- Picture* nf prominent trick 
akater* in action. Price 10 cents. 

So. 1 7H— Mow to Trata for 

lllr, rlii.K. 
Gives methods of the best riders 

when trainitur for I. ingr or short distance 
-nevs: hint* on iraiiiiiiir. Bevieed and 
ip-tn-ifate In every particular. Price 



Group XIV. 



So 



] *0_ Wrcnlllnsj. 

Cstch-as-cstch-ran *tyle. 



Manly 
Sports 



P-vrnly 
llhiatrationnof the different holda, pho- 
tofrraphed eapecially and ao described 
that anybody can with little effort learn 
every one. Price 10 cents. 

SO. I V I .... I. IB. 

By Dn Edward Breek. of Boston, 
editor of The Swordsman, a promi- 
nent amateur fencer. A book that boa 

!of time, and is universally 
ac*r.n«l*>ls-ed to I* a standard work. 
Illustrated. Price lOcento. 

No. I'. ^ 11... I.IK PwtwOJs 

Contains over 70 paeosor illoatratlona 
•howtnaT -sll the latest blows, posed 
*"l-eeial|y for thi* Imok under the super- 
vision of a wetlknown instructor at 
buxinr. wlio makes a specialty of teoeh- 
iiiar and know* how to impart his 
knowledge. Price 10 Centa. 

St.. HIT— rite Art of Kcaclats; 

By Hejris ami l.ml* Sense, of New 

. •"!» snd |e*lins; 
'iivei tn 
dr-tsd how every move ahoukt be mode. 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 234— How In Wrestle. 

Th* nml complete and up-bwlale 

i...... .,.. arn vm% ■ rmi puMI I ™i 

r R I-enb*. snd devoted 
principally to apecislpoaea and illustrs. 
t-Kis by George llackenschmldt, the 
Russian Lwn." Price 10 centa 

v | Q—Mj TatMnhllas;. 



f..^.*n r '.1 • h 



SPALDING ATHLETIC LIBRARY 



No. U^'.t— t 'umbllng for A 
tears. 

Specially compiled for amateurs by 
Dr.JamesT. Gwathmey. Every variety 
of the pastime explained by text iini 
pictures, over 100 different positions 
being shown. Price 14 c«nU. 

No. ID1— Hon to Panel* the 
Has. 

The best trcnlise on i>ag punchmir 
that has ever been primed. Every va- 
riety ■•( blow used in training is shown 
■ ml explained, with a chanter on fancy 
bog punching by a well-known theatri- 
cal bag puncher. Price 10 cenU, 



"P.y Amcrica'satnateurcHnmpianclub 
awinger, J. !!. Do'jghert. . It is clearly 
illustrated, by which any novice can 
become an expert- Price 10 cents. 

No. ^(lU-Dnmb-DelU. 

The beat work on dumb- bell* that 
has ever been offered. By Prof. C. 
Bojus, of New York. Contains 200 
photographs. Should be in tho hands 
of every teacher and pupil of physical 
cull-ure, and is Invaluable for home 
exercise. Price 10 cents. 

No. 1-02— Medicine Hull Kx- 

A series of plain and practical exer- 
cises with th* medicine boll. suitable 
fur boys and irirla, businc** ■ i 
tional men. in and out of gymnasium. 
Price 10 cent*. 

No. 20— Pulley Weight Eter- 

.isrs. 

ByDr.HenryS. Anderson. :i 
In heavy gymnastics Yatu gymnasium. 
In conjunction with a ehe.it machine 
anyone with this book can become 
perfectly developed. Price 10 cents. 

No. rtn-jiu jhs.i. 

Each move thoroughly explained and 
illustrated with numerous full-page 
pictures of Messrs. A. Minami and K. 
Koyatna. two of tlie most famous ex- 
ponents of the art of Jiu Jltsu. who 
posad eapecially for Ibis book. Price 
10 cents. 

No. 100— How to Swing In- 
dian Clubs. 
By Prof. E. B. Worman. By Cottar. 
(tig the directions carefully anyone can 
become an expert. Price 10 centa. 



Croup XV. Gymnastics 

No. 1U4— The Grading of 
Gymnastic Bzerelaea. 

By Q. M. Martin. A book thai should 
he in the hand™ of every physical direc- 
tor of the Y. M. C. A., school, club, cof- 
ega. el*. Price 10 centa. 



O. 2] 1- .Graded I „lis(|,eti- 
lea nml I) b-Bell Urllla. 

For years It has been the custom in 
most gymnasiums of memorising a set 
drill, which was never varied. Conse- 
quently the beginner was given the 
same kind and amount aa the older 
member. With a view to giving uni- 
formity the present treatise is at- 
tempted. Price KLcenta. 

V.j. sr.-l— nnrnjmu liar Bell 

llrlll. 
Edltad by Dr. R. Tait McKeniie, 

Director Physical Traimrur. University 
of Pennsylvania. Profusely II lustra led 
Price 10 cents. 

No. I 5! Indoor and Outdoor 

Gymnastic (intun. 
A book that will prove valuable to in- 
door and outdoor gymnasiums, *:h<x>ls, 
outings and gatherings w'.nn there 
are a number to be amutc^ Frice 10 



By Robert Stoll, of tU New York 
A. C, the America-! cl.ari pion on the 
Hying ntigs from 1SBS u> \69I. Any boy 
ean easily become proficient with a 
tittle practice. Price 10 cents. 



All concede that game* and recreative 
exercisesdu'ing the adolescent period 
are preferable to Mrdritlaandnmiioinri- 
OOtt movcme.Us. These drills, while de- 
sinned ririm.irily for boyn. can l>e used 
Huccnssfull) with girls and men and 
women. Profusely illustrated. Price 
10 cents. 

Group XVI. cufture 

No. Kll-Teo Minnies' Bael- 

• i««* for li us > Men. 

By Dr. Luther Ilalsey Gulick. Diree- 

tor of Physical Training in the New 

York Public School*, A concise and 

Count of physical education. 

Price 10 centa. 

No. 2<>N— Physical Kdooatlon 
ami Hygiene. 
This is the fifth of the Phyalcal 
Training srn-i by Prof. E. B. Wurman 
(sec No*. 142, 149. 1«. l»fi. 113.2*11. 2*0. i 
Price 10 cents. 

No. 1-40— The Catreof the Doily. 

A book that all who value health 
should road and follow its Instructions. 
By Prof. E. B.Werman. the well-known 
lecturer and authority on physical cul- 
ture. Price 10 cant*. 



No. 142— Physical Tralulug 
Simplified. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman. A complete, 
thorough and practical book where the 
whole man ia considered — brain and 
body. Price 10 cents. 

No. IKS— Health, Hints. 

R* I'm/ K. R. Weimar. Health in. 
Ruenced by Insulation; health influ- 

etii-rd .'.r onuiTuvnr; health influenced 
by ccior; exercise. Price 10 cents. 

No. 213-280 Health ssiwtri. 

B/ Prof. E. B. Warman. Contents: 
ventilating a bedroom; ventilating a 
.loose; how to obtain pure air: bathing; 
aalt water hatha at home; a substitute, 
for ic« water; to cure insomnia, etc., 
etc. Price- 10 cents. 

No. 234— Muscle Building. 

By Dr. L. H. Gulick. Director of Phy- 
sical Training m the New York Public 
Schools. A" complete treatise on the 
correct method of acquiring strength. 
Illustrated Price 10 cents. 



A aerieaof drills for the use of schools. 
Edited by Dr. Luther Halaey Gulick, 
Director of Physical Training in th* 
New York Public Schools. Price W 
cents. 

No. 201— Tensing Kxarelawi. 

By Prof. E. B. Warman. Th* '*Ten- 
■ing" or "Resisting" ayatem of mus- 
cular exercises Is the most thorough, 
the most complete, the most sat irtfac» 
lory, and the most fascinating of ay*. 
terns. Price 10 cents. 

No. 2So— Health! by Musc«> 
lar i.» iiiiiiist ice. 

Wtti hints on right living. By W.J. 
Cromie. If one will practice the exer- 
cises and observe the hints therein 
contained, he will be amply repaid for 
so doing. Price 10 cents. 

No. 2ms— Indigestion Treated 
l»y Uymnautleg 

By W. J. Cromie. If the hints there- 
in contained are observed and the 
exercises faithfully performed great 
relief will be experienced. Price 10 
cent*. 



By Prof. E. B. Warman. authoY of a 
number of book* i in the Spalding Ath- 
letic Library op physical training. 
Price 10 cents. 



CONSTITUTION AND | 

PLAYING RULES S 

OF THE ^ 

NATIONAL LEAGUE 

* or r 

PROFESSIONAL 
BASE BALL CLUBS 



1909 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



§ 



NEW YORK 

American Sports Publishing Company 
21 warren street 



a 



COPYRIGHT, 1909 
BY 

American Sports Piiumsiiino Company 
Nbw York 



Constitution of the National League 
of Professional Base Ball Clubs 

1909 

Adopted March 8, 1904. 

Amended December, 1905; February, 1906; February, 1907; December, 

1907; February, 1908; December, 1908, and February, 1909. 



Name. 

SECTION 1. This Association shall be called the Na- 
tional Leagui of Professional Base Ball Clubs. 

Objects. 

SEC. 2. The objects of this l eague arc: 

1. To immortalize Base Ball as the national game of the 
. nited Stat s. 

2. To surround it with such safeguard! as to warrant 
ib olute public confidence in its integrity and methods. 

3. To protect and promote the mutual interests of pro-. 
i nal Ba e Ball clubs and professional Base Ball players, 

and 

4. To establish and regulate the professional Base Ball 
championshij of the United Si 

Membership. 

SEC. 3. This League shall consist of eighl clubs (the 

membership shall not be increa ed or diminished except 

by unanimous consent of the League), located in and 

n etiting the following cities, to wit: Boston, New York, 

iklyn, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, Cincinnati, St. Louis 

.,,!,] ago, and in no event shall there be more than om 

club in an) city. 

Withdrawal from Membership. 

SEC. 4. Any club member of the League unable to meel 
the obligations it has assumed maj ask the League for per 
mission to dispose of its rights and franchises as a member 
of the League in that city to some othei corporation. In 
the event of this League giving its consent to the tn 



of membership from one company to another it must be 
understood thai the new member -.hull assume with 
franchise and rights of the retiring company all the lia- 
bilities, responsibilities and obligations entered into by 

the retiring company. It musl a! o be underst 1 bj the 

retiring and mpany that the company retiring >li:ill 

nol be relieved or released from any contract or obligation 
entered into by it to this League until all of aid contracts 
and obligations have been fully paid and determined by the 
company accepting its membership, rights and franchises. 

Admission to Membership. 
SEC. 5. ,\ company to be admitted t'> membership in 
ue must first deliver to the Secretary of the 
written application ident and 

Secretary, accompanied by documents snowing that such 
company is regularly organized, chartered and officered, and 
pared to fully comply with the provisions of Section t 
oi this Constitution. Such applii 
transmitted by the Secretary to the Board of Direi 
who shall immediately investigate and report upon said 
application, said report to be communicated t" the I.- 
through the Secretary. 

SEC. 6. Hi, voting upon an application for membership 
snail bi by ballot, a thn being requisiti 

I toa 

In Regard to Vacancies. 
SEC. 7. | n ,-•,.,- ; , v;i , an j n ,],,, memberjbip ,,f 

this organization during the champi 
•Kin shall nominate to all the clubs all applii 
bership; and the vote thereon ms graph 

" r P*"' 3 i may requ of all the 

clubs will be required to admit any applicant to metnber- 
J/J'P- Sl "' 1 ' "" shall continue only until 

lr "'"■■' annual meeting, but uch ■ lub ball b 
'"' ""' ru,es and requin cm. 

Termination of Membership. 

f EC T, 8 ' '"" ip of any club maj be termin 

, f ;,, nal <lul d by a three fourth 

Sor?V '" meetmg ' h,1 > 

aun,-,! 1 ,,,,,'!!'?'"' I" ''" ,i,,, •• •""' 



3. By allowing open betting or pool selling upon its 
grounds or in any building owned or occupied by it. 

4. By playing any game of ball with a club that is dis- 
qualified or ineligible under this Constitution. 

5. By offering, agreeing, conspiring or attempting to lose 
.any game of ball; or failure td immediately expel any 
player who shall be proven guilty of offering, agreeing, 

conspiring or attempting to lose any game of ball, or of 

being interested in any pool or wager thereon 

6. P.\ disbandment of its organization or club team 
during the championship season. 

7. By failing or # rcfusing to fulfill its contractual obli- 
ons. 

8. By failing or refusing to comply with any lawful re- 
quirement of the Board of Directors. 

<). By wilfully violating any provision of tbis Constitu- 
tion, or the legislation or playing rules made in pursuance 
thereof, or any violation of the provisions of the National 
Agreement. 

The Expulsion of Clubs. 
SEC. 9. To carry into effect the provisions of Section 8 
of this Constitution, the facts in any case covered by such 
section must be reported to the Secretary of the League, 
who shall at once notify by mail or telegraph the party 
charged with the specified default or offense, and inquire 
whether any dispute exists as to the facts alleged. In case 
the facts are disputed, the Board shall, after due notice, 
try the case under such regulations as they may prescribe; 
and their finding shall be final and conclusive on all parties 
■1 in case of expulsion, wben sucb finding shall be for- 
warded to each club, which shall transmit to the Secretary 
written ballots "For Expulsion" or "Againsl Expulsion"; 
a n,l if jeven clubs vote "For Expulsion" the Secretary shall 
notifj all clubs of the forfeiture of membership of the party 
charged. 

Dues and Assessments. 

SEC. 10. 1. Each club -ball pa to the Secretar; 
,,,. before tin- firsl day of April of each year, the sum of 
annual dues, and in addition thereto sucb other 
sum, as from lime to time may b>- assessed, the assessments 

to be levied againsl the various clubs in accordance witb 

their standing in the championship race of the previous year, 
in the following manner: The club finishing first shall be 



required to pay 20 per cent of 1! dent; the club 

finishing second [8 per cent, the club finishing third n 
cent, the club finishing fourth 14 per cent, the club fin 
ing fifth in per cent, the club finishing sixth 8 per cent, 
and the clubs finishing seventh and eighth respectively, 7 
per cent each. Provided, however, thai when two or more 
clubs have finished a tie in the preceding year, the com- 
bined 11 hi-, against such clubs shall be equally pro 
ruled between them in accordance with the above per- 
centages. Hiese assessments shall be for the payment 
of salaries of officers and umpires, and for such 
other expi may be incurred by order of this 
League or the Board of Directors. \.lso .-ill lines and 
penalties imposed by said League or its Board of 
Directors upon a club or upon any club officer, pi 
manager, scorer, or other employe when so levied and im 
posed by virtue of, and in accordance with, the provi 
of this Constitution and the Playin ' eague. 
2. Upon conviction of any of thi prescribed in 
Section X as causes for expulsion, the Board of Directors 
may, in the first instance, as a preliminary to, or in lieu 
[pulsion, impose such a fine as is in their judgment 
commensurate with the injury: which fine may include 
a penalty payable to any other club or clubs as an equiva- 
lent For dance" tained fo such violation of this 
Constitution, or of the legislation or contracts made in pur- 
suane 



Officers. 
SEC. 11. At it- annual meeting the 
a President and a Secretary-Treasurer and Board of D 
tor , 1 h< I '1 e idi nl hall bi - officii 1 ' !haii man of the 
I le shall report ti 1 the Boat d 1 if I Hrec- 
any violation of the pri ivision of tl 1 itution thai 
may 1 omi to his knowledge. Hi hall inter- 

prets of the Playing Rule during lh< 1 ham] 
1 I hall pn idi at all the tni 1 ting of the League, and a) 
'1m annual meeting ol the I 
committee, unless said meeting hall othe wise direct 
Should the offic< of the 

death, resignation, or removal, till I'.oard of I 

within thirty days thereafter, ehct a President. 

of President and Secretary-' may be held by the 

same person. 



The Secretary's Duties. 

SEC. 12. 'I he Secretary shall be the I reasurer of the 
League, and as such shall Ik- the custodian of all funds of 

the League, receive all dues, fees and assessments, which 
shall be placed to the credit of the Treasurer in SOmi 
hank of deposit to meet cut 'rent expenses, lie shall make 

such payments as shall be ordered by the Board or by the 
vote of the League, and render annually a report of Ins 

nuts; and he shall give such bond, with approval sure- 
ties, as the Board may require. 

SEC. 13. The Secretary shall have the custody and care 
of the official records and papers of the League; shall keep 
a true stenographic record of all meetings of the League 
and the Hoard; shall issue all official notices, and attend 
to the necessary correspondence; he shall also prepare and 

furnish such reports as may be called for by the Hoard, 

and shall be entitled to such I ks, Stationery, blanks and 

materials as the actual duties of his office may require. 

SEC. 14. The Secretary shall keep a record of all in- 
fractions of the rules and regulations of the League that 
may come under his notice, and shall make' a report on the 
same to the Board at its next meeting. 

SEC. 15. The President and Secretary shall receive 

such salaries as the Board by vote shall determine, and 
shall he reimbursed for all traveling expenses actually in- 
curred by them in the service of the League; and the 
Board may exact from them such guarantee for the faith 
ful performance of their duties as they would deem for 
the interest and safety of the League, At the expiration of 
their terms of office they shall account for. and delivi 
to the Hoard, all the property and papers which may have 

come into their hands by virtue of their offices. 

SEC. 16. 'I he Hoard of Directors shall i of the 

President and live other members, to be chosen at thi 
annual meeting by ballot. 

SEC. 17. lii case of vacancy in the Board bj rea on of 

the death, resignation, absence, or disqualification of any 

ior, the club of which he was a member, at the time 

he was cho eii, hall designate hi. ucci sor, and ai once 

notify the Secretary. Hut if such vacani ed by the 

withdrawal, disbanding, or disqualification of a club reprc- 

C(l on the Hoard, the Hoar.; maj till the vacancy by 

on in the same maimer as provided for the electio 

Directors in Section [I. 



8 

Qualification of Directors. 

SEC. 18. No person shall be qualified to act as Director 
who is not an actual member of the dob he represents; 
nor shall any club under any circumstances, be repr< 
by more than one person on the Board of Directors; nor 
-hall any Director sit in the trial of a cause in which his 
club is interested. 

SEC. 19. The Board shall meel annually on the morn- 
ing of the second Tuesday in December, at i_> o'clock noon, 
at the place where the annual meeting of the Lea 
be held, hui may hold special meetings upon the call of the 

President or two members of the Hoard, whenever urgent 

necessity may require. 

SEC. 20. The Board shall prepare a detailed report of 
•til their dun,--,, and present the -am.- in writing to the 
League at its annual meeting; which report -hall, if ac- 
cepted, he til.-d wnh the Secretary, together with all official 

. documents and property which may have come into 

iIm -"' posse -Mil bj virtue of their office. 

SEC. 21. I In- Hoard shall have a general supervision 

and management of all the affair.-, and business of the 
League, including the award of the championship and such 
other duties expressedfy or impliedly conferred upon them 
by tins Constitution, or by legislation made in pursu 

thereof It shall be th< d exclusive tribunal fol 

the trial ..f managers or players for any violation of this 
Lonstitution or of the playing rules or other rub- of dis 
ciptme, mile-- -.he League bj a three-fourths vote of its 
'I"!' membership, -hall otherwise direct, it -hall be the 

SOte and exclusive tribunal to hear and detennii,. 

Detween clubs, comniaints by a club against the manager 
'" Player of another club, or by a manager or playi 

lub, or an appeal by a player again I fi pen 

'"" '" expulsion by hi- own club, or complaint In the 

ll ," 1 '" I,! against a dub for failun 

P*y with < onstitution requirements, and general! 

»;.io., o,;,]i, ofthis 

iupursuSS: ' Rules and other legislation made 

such r,',i. 22- i ' '"' B ? ard s ' K,il -'"'"i' 1 "• || regulations and 

of V ,,,, l ""'",'"' '"''• f " r ,lu ' l "' : "'""-; and determination 

■ ' utes and complaints brought before then. Where 

Pla'ed i, ,' 17" r '' ,: '""" "' ■■' Bame alleged to have 
Played in violation of thi i „ „„. 1Mavillg 



Rules, (lie complaint and accompanying proofs must be 
filed within five days alter the date of said game with 
the President of the Board, who shall scud a copj of the 
same to the other clubs, with orders to file its answer within 
five days thereafter. The Presidenl of the Board shall in 

the first instance decide the dispute on its merits and fo ill 
with communicate his decision to both clubs, either of which 
may within five days appeal from said decision to the full 
Hoard. Said decision, together with all other documents and 
proofs, shall thereupon he transmitted for a mail vote to the 
different members of the Hoard. The finding of the Board 
shall be final, and tinder no circumstance-, shall be recon- 
sidered, reopened or inquired into, either by the League or 
any subsequent Hoard. 

SEC. 23. The Hoard shall at once consider any coin 

plaint preferred by a club against a manager or player of 
another club (prior to the expiration of the championship 
season) for conduct in violation of any provision of this 
Constitution, or prejudicial to the good repute of the game 
of base ball and shall have power to require the club, to 
which such player or manager may belong, to discipline 
him, and upon repetition of such offense to expel him. 
Provided, that such complaint be preferred in writing, 
giving such particulars as may enable the Board to ascer- 
tain all the facts, and such particulars shall be transmitted 
to the Secretary, by whom it shall at once he referred to 
the Hoard. In all cases where charges are preferred by 
any regularly appointed League umpire again-.! any player 
for violation of the Playing Rules or for conduct on the 
hall field prejudicial to the good repute of the game of base 
hall, the President shall have the sole jurisdiction to pass 
upon said charges and inflict penalties, if any, subject only 
to the restriction that in no case where expulsion is fixed 
shall same be put into effect until ratified by the Hoard of 
Directors. 

SEC. 24. In case a player, under contract with a League 
dub, hall, dining a current season, prefer a complaint in 
writing to the Secretary of tin- League against such a 
club, alleging that such club is in arrears to him for sal- 
ary for more than fifteen days after such salary became due 
on account of such contract, the Secretary shall at once 
transmit to the said club a copy of such complaint, and re- 
quire an answer thereto. On receipt of such answer, or if 
live (lavs shall have elapsed without receipt of an an 
th • Secretary shall refer the papers in the case to the 



10 



Board of Directors, and should the Board find the player's 
complaint sustained, they shall require the club, under pen- 
alty of forfeiture of its membership, to paj to the player 
forthwith the full amount ascertained to be due him. Pro- 
yided, thai should the player refuse to serve the club pend- 
ing action by the Board on his complaint, he will thereby 
forfeit the benefits of the award, and in such case the 
Board shall revoke his award. 

SEC. 25. iii,. Board shall promptly hear an appeal 
made by any person who shall have been expelled, sus- 
pended or disciplined by Ins club, except in cases of expul- 
sion as provided in Section 38. Such person shall, within 
thirty days after the date of the expulsion, suspension or 
discipline, file with the Secretary a written statement of his 

defense, accompanied by a request that an appeal be 
allowed him. 'Mi, Secretary shall notify the club of the 
request for an appeal, accompanying such notice with a 

copy of the appeal; and at the next meeting of the Board 
the club, by its duly authorized representative, and the ap- 
pellant in person, by attorney <>r by written statement, shall 
appear before the Hoard with their testimony. 'I he Hoard 
-hall impartially hear the matter and render their decision. 
which shall be final and forever binding on both club and 
player. 

SEc 26. Anv player under contract or reservation who 
may consider himself unjustly treated or wronged b 

club shall have the right to submit his case lo the I 

dent of the League, who shall, after soliciting evidence 

rning the matter, present thi 1 the Hoard for 

hearing, recommendation or adjudication. The Board 

have authority to impose any just fine or pecuniary 

penalty on a club, a manager or a player, if warranted by 
their findings and decisions, and they may impose the 

if trials and he irit (It 01 both partit ti 

the controversy. Hut such fine, penalty and expen es may 
be remitted by a three-fourths vote of the League upon 

appeal duly made and heard at an annual or Special 

meeting. 

Individual Club Control. 

SEC T 27- Ea<* club -ball have the right to regulat 
" WM affair , ,,, otherwise provided, - 

the League ma> from time to time determine, and, in doing 

[?" have the 1 tablish its own rules and to 

discipline, punish, suspend or expel its own man: 
other employes, and these powers shall no 



11 

limited to cases of dishonest play or open insubordination, 
but shall include all questions of carelessness, indifference 
or other conduct of the player that may be regarded bj the 
club as prejudicial to its interest, and not in conflict with 
any provision of this Constitution, or the Playing Rules 

of this League. 



Punishment of Scandalous Conduct. 

SEC. 28. The President of the League shall have- 
power, upon proper proof, to suspend for a definite period 
and to impose a fine not exceeding $200 upon any League 
manager or player guihy, in public, of gross misbehavior, 

including intoxication, fighting, quarreling, indecency or 

other scandalous conduct, whether on or off the playing 

field, during the- season, where the same is, in his opinion. 
calculated to bring disrepute upon the National League or 
National Game. Such line can only he remitted by the 
Board of Directors after a hearing upon appeal duly prose- 
cuted. 

Club Territorial Rights. 

SEC. 29. Every club of this League shall have exclus- 
ive control of the city 111 which it is located, and of the 
territory surrounding such city, to the extent of live miles 
iii every direction from it< corporate limits, and no visit- 
ing League club shall, under any circumstances, be allowed 
to play . ny club in such territory other than the League 
club therein located, without the con, cut of the local 

League club. 

Reservation of Players 

SEC. 30. Each club a member of this League shall be 
entitled to the right of reservation, < m or before the 20th 
of September in each year each club shall transmit to 
the Secretary a reserve list of the players whose services it 
desires to retain for the ensuing season, and who are then 
under contract to the said club lor the current or for any 
succeeding season or seasons, and in addition thereto the 
m, mi oi ii' h players reserved in any prior annual list who 

l.avc refused to contract wiih said club, Such players, to- 
gether with all others thereafter to be regularly contracted 
with, namely, players who have been soured l>> purchase 
or draft under the National Agreement for future services 
shall be ineligible to contract with any other club in this 
League except as hereinafter provided No club shall have 
the right to reserve any player when in arrears of salary to 



12 

him. The Secretary shall promulgate such lists on or be- 
fore September 25th of each year. 

Negotiating for Services. 
SEC. 31. No player, without the consent of the club 
with which he is under contract or reservation, shall enter 
into negotiations with any other club for future services. 

Contracts. 
SEC. 32. Contracts made between a club and its play- 
ers may be either by telegram or writing, to be followed 
within ten days thereafter by a contract in the form 

approved and promulgated by me President to all the clubs 
of the League. 

SEC. 33. 'I he League shall adopt such form of contract 
as it may deem best for the protection of the rights of 

the parties thereto. All contracts must he approved by the 

lent ami duly promulgated by him. Win-never a club 
erves notice on a player that his contract will he termi- 
nated in tin days, the President of the League shall be 
notified by wire and the ['resident of the League shall 
telegraph the other seven clubs the information. A failure 
"l any club to comply with this provision shall subject 
such club to a tine to lie fixed by the Board of Directors; 
the tine t., he not less than $25.00; and in a ease where a 
violation of this section results in the loss of the player 
to the National League it shall !)'■ at an amount com- 
mensurate with the player's ability. For a period of ten 
days after notice of served on a National League 

r any other club shall have the right to claim without 
cost the player released and to negotiate for his services, 
and the player shall he ineligible to contract with a club of 

another League; provided, however, that when a club 
desins to release a player out of the League, such club 
shall immediately notify the Pre idem of the League, who 
shall notify all other National League clubs of such <h 
l }<>: failure or a club to notify the President of the League 

waiver within five (5) days during the championship 

season, if a player he nude' contract, or ten no) 
during the period between the close of one championship 
season and the beginning of another, will operate 
legal waiver. If. however, a club of this League, refused 
in writing to waive claim, then the following rule shall 
apply: If the player sought to be released out of the 



13 

League is a purchased player or otherwise acquired save 
l>> draft, tin Presidenl of the League shall fix the price 
in be paid by the club refusing to waive claim, with this 
proviso: that the amount so fixed shall not exceed $1,500. 
1 1 the player be a drafted player, then the draft price shall 
be paid. In cases where two or more clubs refuse to waive 
claim, the claim of the clubs shall be determined by lot~by 
the Presidenl of the League. In no case, however, shall 
the club asking for the waiver have the privilege or right 
nf retaining a player once that player is claimed under this 
constitutional provision. All refusals to waive must be 
followed by check for the amount fixed by the President. 
During the waiver periods above specified no club shall 
be permitted to send a player out of the League on the 

assumption that all clubs will waive claim. A failure to 
observe this rule will cause the offending club to be amen- 
able to a penalty to be fixed by tile Board of Directors ill 
its discretion, and, furthermore, the offending club shall 
be ordered by the Board of Directors to pay to the club 
damaged by this breach of the ( '1 institution the amount so 
sustained. Said line and damages must lie paid within ten 
days after once imposed. file following limitations shall 
apply to all waivers: (1) If waiver is secured between 
playing seasons it shall expire al the expiration of ten 
days from the beginning of the succeeding championship 
season. (2) If secured during the championship season, 
it shall expire at the expiration of thirty days from date 
when waiver is requested from League headquarters. 

Suspension and Expulsion of Players. 

SEC. 34. Any player, while under contract with, or 
reservation by, a League club, who shall without the con- 
sent of such club, enter the service of any other club in 
air" capacity, shall be liable t" expulsion by said League 
club. Whenever a club suspends or expels a manager or 
player, that club shall at once notify the Secretary of this 
League, stating the date when the same takes effect, and 
in case of suspension or expulsion, tin' cause thereof. 

SEC. 35. No manager or player, who has been sus- 
pended or expelled from a League club, shall at any time 
thereafter be allowed \,, play with, or serve in any capacity, 
any League club (either the one expelling him or any 
other) unless the term of suspension by the club has ex- 
pired, or upon his appeal to this League, such expulsion or 
suspension shall have been set aside. 



14 

Effect of Club Disbandment, 
SEC. -6. The disbandment of a League club, or its 
withdrawal from <>r loss of League membership, shall oper- 
ate as a release of its players from contract and reserva- 
tion with said club, bul the righi to contract with and 
reserve said players shall revert to the League, and they 
shall be subject to transfer to such other club as the 
League may designate after acceptance of their said 

services. 

Playing with Outside Clubs. 
SEC. 37. No game of base ball shall be played be- 
tween a League club and any other club that has been ex- 
pelled from membership in this League. No game of ball 
shall be played between a League club and any other club 
employing or presenting in its nine a player expelled, or 
under suspension from the League, or otherwise ren- 
dered ineligible by this League or a club member thereof. 

Crookedness and its Penalties. 
SEC. 38. Any person who shall be proven guilty of 
offering, agreeing, conspiring or attempting to cause any 
game of ball to result otherwise than on its merits under 
the Playing Rules, shall be forever disqualified by the 
President of the League from acting as umpire, manager, 
player or in any other capacity in any game of ball part i - 
cipated in by a League club. 

Umpires. 

SEC. 39. A staff of League umpires shall he selected by 
the President bet'., re the opening of the regular season. 

i. Applicant for the position of umpire must state age, 
nee, • p abits and such other qualifications 

as may be prescribed on forms prepared by the President, 
which must have the endorsement of those who from skilled 
and personal knowledge can recommend the applicant for 
the position. 

Independent of such ei lentS, however, the Presi- 

dent shall make inr|ttiries and inform himself, a- I 
practicable, as to the merits and qualifications of each ap- 
plicant 

2 - " he paid such salaries and allowed such 

expenses as may be mutually agreed upon by contra 
tween them and the !'• dent of the League, subject to the 
approval of the Board of Directors of the I 



15 

Bui at leasl ten per cent, of current salaries shall be with- 
held In the President until the termination of his contract 
for thai season to secure such deductions for absences and 
the payment oi such fines as may be lawfully impo 

3. In the event of thi failure of an umpire in umpire 
a game assigned to him it shall be the duly of the l 
dent to provide a substitute to umpire such game; and in 
such case there shall be deducted from the next payment to 
tin- umpire the sum of twelve dollars for each game as- 

d to him, which for any reason he shall have failed 
I" umpire. 

4. It shall be the duty of each League club to accept as 
umpire for any championship game such umpire or sub- 
stitute as the President shall assign to such game. In the 
event of the m i ince of the League umpire or sub- 
stitute al the hour appointed for the beginning of the 
game each club captain shall then select on< of the sub- 
stitute ])I.i ihe opposing club, and the two players 
thus selected shall be the duly authorized umpires for that 
game, 

5- It shall be the duty of umpires to enforce the rules 
as they are written, regardless of personal opinion as to 
their merits, si the President's instructions as to 

their proper interpretation. They shall familiarize them- 
selves with these section! of the Constitution, obej all or- 
of the Presidi nt, assigning their services and wear such 
uniform on the playing field as he may designate. 



Supervision of Umpires. 

SEC. 40. AH complaints against umpires shall he suh- 

ih to the I'm ident, who 
shall i ps aa he may deem proper (governed 

by tl of the charges) to ascertain as to the conv- 

ey of the umpire complained of and to verify, ii 
sible, by his own pei onal observation a to his mei 

n [f the complaint be for a wilful violation of this 
Con titution, or of the Playing Rules oi for neglect or re- 
in enforce any of said rules or for anj impropi 

■ ruage or conduct while officiating as an 
umpire, and if upon investigation it be substantiated, the 

i to t'""'. remove, suspend or 
expel the offender, as in his judgment the offense may 
justify. 



16 

Committees. 
SEC. 41. At each annua! meeting of the League the 
President shall appoint a committee of three on Playing 
Rules, i committee of three on Schedule and a committee 
i>i three on Constitutional Amendmem 

The Championship. 

SEC. 42. The Championship of the United States, es- 
tablished by this L< I il] I, ended for yearly 

by the clubs composing the League. 

SEC. 43. '| he championship season shall extend from 
such date in April or May to such date in September or 
October as the Leaeue may determine at its stated or 
special meeting', 

SEC. 44. Every game played between two clubs from 
the commencement of the championship season to the 
completion of the championship series between such clubs 
shall be a game for the championship, and no League club 
shall lend or exchange p - or with each othei 

any game played during the championship season. Any 
violation of tin ection shall subject each offender to a 

line of $100. 

SEc. 45. Each club shall play twi or more 

championship games with everj other club in the League. 
\ tie game, or a game prevented by ram or othi 
shall be played off on the same ground on which 
during the same or any subsequent series, the date to be 
optional with the home dub. Provided, that the dap 
ng off such postponed or tie name musl be at 
fixed by the home club; the visiting club and President of 
tin- League to be notified of such date before eight o'clock 
I . M., oi ,iay such postponement or : and in 

event date for such play-off be fixed for the next d 
the same series, the home dub shall also notify the umpire 
or umpires then officiating in that city. 

sec. 46. Each club shall have half of the champion- 
'""'i' with every other club played on its 

pounds except as otherwise provided in < and 

it a i the details of such yam,-, thai do not involve the 
ngnts ,]„. vlsltttlg ,.,„,, under fhe p)a ^ Rul ,, m 

v to such games as attractive exhibit 

"., L 1 / "" 1 ,"' dt,b ' ''"• visitin 8 Club shall defer to 

- wishes of the home club; provided, nevertheless, that 

hour f r l H '' n '"" '"' i»- rll """'l to change the usual 

hour for the commencement of cheduled games in its par- 



17 

ticular city more than thirty (30) minutes without first 
having obtained the consent of the visiting club thereto, 
under a penalty u> the visiting club of $500. Tin- visiting 
club shall furnish to a person designated by the home club 
the batting order of its nine by if) o'clock on the morning 
of the day of each game, or the evening previous, if re- 
quested. In case of the failure of any visiting club to fur- 
nish the batting order of its nine as herein stipulated, it 
shall forfeit the sum of $10, which amount shall be imme- 
diately transmitted to the Secretary of the League, upon 
the receipt of noiice from him of the infliction of such 
line, which notice shall be given by the Secretary upon 
receipt of complaint from the home club. 

It shall he the duty of the home club to furnish the 
manager and captain of the visiting club with a list of the 
balling order before the commencement of the game under 
similar penalties for default as herein prescribed. The 
visiting club shall have the right to practice its nine on the 
grounds of the home club between 11 and ]_• o'clock A. M. 
hi each day of its visit during the championship season. 

The Championship Schedule. 

SEC. 47. All championship games shall be arranged in 
a written schedule prepared by the Schedule Committee, 
and reported to and adopted by the League by a three- 
fourths vote before the beginning of the championship sea- 
son. The schedule shall provide for an equal number of 
return games, and shall specify the date of each game and 
the date of each Series of games. Xo date in said schedule 
shall subsequent I \ be changed, except ( 1 ) by written agree- 
ment of two clubs from a date fixed by the schedule for 
a game between such clubs to an open date on the same 
ground; or (J) as provided in Section 4S! or (3) by the 
written consent of three -fourths of all the League clubs. 

Any club or clubs violating this section shall be amen- 
able to a penalty of $I,O00. Said penalty to be paid within 
forty-eight hours to the Treasurer of the League, or if 
not so paid to lie withheld from any funds to their credit 
111 the hands of the Treasurer. Ml games played in viola- 
tion of this section shall not count in the championship 
series. 

The Admission Fees and Receipts. 

SEC. 48. 1 be general admission fee to all champion- 
ship games shall be fifty (50) cents, but each club shall 
nate a part of its grounds, and provide seats thereon, 



18 

the admission fee to which shall lie twenty-five (25) cents, 
ami all division of percentages shall !»• made on the basis 
of fiftv (50) cents, except as to thai pari of thi 
tin admission fee to which is fixed at twenty-five 1 
cents, and as to such pan of said all divisions of 

ntage shall be on the ba is oi twentj five (25) cents. 
At the conclusion of eai h championship game the 1 
club shall deliver to the manager of thi club (and 

shall transmit by mail to the President or other designated 
I the visiting club a duplicate of the same 1 a 
nent of the receipts of said game, which must in 
all fifty-cent and twenty-five cent admissions, and shall pay 
to the visiting club fifty per centum of ipl 

The Ball Park. 

SEC. 49. Each park shall be provided with a sufficient 

number of exits and entrance (not exceeding four) for 

imodation of the public, and a separate entrance 

shall be maintained for the convenience ol the press rep- 

tat h es and those 1 ntitli 1 lurtesies of the 

grounds. 

1. Additional entrance, may be Opened Upon holidays. 

but for such days thi visiting club shall I"' given at least 

ten days' notice of the whole nunibei and their location. 

2. Emergency gates may bi time b> 
sent of the visiting club, if occasion requiri 

3. Each park shall also be provided with proper and 

for visiting players, the 
same to be supplied with toilet conveniences, ho1 and 
water, and shower bath-, and to contain twenty suil 
lockers for such players, Such dressing room to be prop 
erly heated and cared for, and made subject to the control 

during upancy thereof of the players of th 

club. The penalty for failure to p and maintain 

such d in hall be twenty live dollar 

for each daj of failure to provide the ami 

thi rule, the same to be assi ed and colli cted by the 

Secretary of the League upon complaint of the visiting club. 

4. A visiting club hall nol be permitted to convey its 
players, to or from thi of any other club, in 
uniform unless special permission therefor has been 
granted h the President of the League, or some 
emergencj arise? lo warrant it. A vii ' this rule 
shall be punishable by the infliction of a fine of fifty dollars 
for each day the rule is violated 



19 

The Turnstile Count. 
SEC. 50. The number of persons admitted to the 
grounds shall be determined by the use ni the necessary 
number of self-registering turnstiles, the arms of which 
shall extend within four inches of a dividing partition, the 
keys of which shall be delivered to the agent of the visit- 
ing club before the opening of the grounds for each game; 
and said agent of the visiting club shall have full access 
to such turnstile, and the box of such turnstile shall not be 
removed until after the close of the seventh inning, and in 
case a carriage gate is used a ticket for each person ad- 
mitted through such gate shall at once be delivered to the 
agent of the visiting club. The visiting club shall have 
'lie right to accept the turnstile count for each and all 
games, or to count all tickets. Each club shall be required 
to use for its business tickets, with rain checks attached, 
which have been approved by the League and which can 
be readily counted. At the 'conclusion of each game the 
viHiing club shall receive a copy of the ticket sale state- 
ment. 

Special Entrance. 
SEC. 51. No p crson shalj he admitted free to a cham- 
pionship game, except players ami officers of contesting 
clubs, umpires, policemen in uniform, necessary employes 
pi the home dub. representatives of the i>:ess and such 
invited guests as the President of the home club may 
deem proper to recognize, all of whom must pass through 

a self-registering turnstile at the special entrance provided 
for the press, and said turnstile shrill he subject to the 
•one right of i n bj the visiting club that is pro- 

vided in all other cntrai: 

. '• It shall be the duty of the President of the League to 
inspect all hall parks from time to lime, and to report to 
the Board of Directors any failure to comply with this 
or any other section of the Constitution. 

Stopping Play to Catch Trains. 
SEC. 52. (in any day when either club is required to 

leave a city to. or ill order to reach another city in time, 
where it is scheduled to play its next game, the home club 

shall be compelled, upon proper notice by the visiting 

club, to begin the game three hours and a half before the 
tune of the departure of the last train by means of which 
either club can reach next scheduled point in time. And 



20 

either club may leave the field at any lime within one hour 
of said train time without forfeiting any rights or privi- 
leges, provided five innings on each side have been played, 
and the umpire shall he the sole judge of the lime. 

Giving out Admission Checks. 
SEC. 53. In the event of a game being topped by rain 
or declared forfeited before completion of five innings, the 
home cluh may issue admission checks good for the next 
succeeding same. If such cluck-, are o i ued, the visit- 
ing cluh shall not he entitled to its percentage of receipt-; 
but if such checks are not issued the visiting club shall 
be entitled to its percentage of receipts, precisely as if the 
game had been fully pl.v 

Forfeited Games. 
SEC. 54. A club shall be entitled to forfeited games — 
to count in its series as games won by a Score of nine 
runs to none — in case where the umpire in any champion 
ship game shall award the game to BUch club nil account 
of the violation by the contesting club of any section of 
this Constitution or of any playing rules. In the event of a 
forfeiture for any reason, the forfeiting club shall incur 
such penalty not exceeding one thousand dollars as may bo 

imposed by tin- Board of Director- after a hearing held 

within one week from the date of such game, and any 
damages suffered by the non < club -hall be paid 

out of stub penalty. In addition to the penalty above re. 
ferred to. the captain or manager, or the person in charge 
of the offending team and responsible for the team hav- 
ing the field, shall incur a penalty of one hundred dollars, 
which shall be paid within five days to the Secretary of the 

1 ■ I'd penalty not to be remitted under any circum- 

stances. l n ea-c Mich penalties are not paid within ten 
being imposed, the club and player cannot par- 
ticipate in a championship game. 

Drawn Games. 

SEC. 55. Drawn, tie and | -hall not 

count m the series as gan nv game of not less than 

five inning- shall be included in the averages I. but inii-l 

be played off. if possibli id.d in Seen,,,, 4; If 

cannot be played off. .-, provided, the) 

subsequently be played off. • before 

the close of the season. 



21 

Double games for one admission shall not be permitted 
unless previously scheduled as such or rendered compul- 
sory by the playing off of postponed games, as provided in 
Section 45. 

Winning the Pennant. 

SEC. 56. The club which shall have won the greatest 
percentage of games in the championship series, shall be 
declared the champion club of the United States, for the 
season in which such games were played. In the event 
that two or more clubs shall have won the same per- 
centage of games, then the Board shall at once arrange a 
special series of three games between any two of such 
clubs, such games to be played at the close of the cham- 
pionship season, and the games so played shall be included 
in the championship record, and counted in determining 
the award of the championship. In such case only the pro- 
visions of this Constitution prohibiting the playing or re- 
cording as championship games, games played after the ex- 
piration of the championship season, shall have no effect. 
The emblem of the championship shall be a pennant (of 
the National colors) to cost not less than one hundred 
dollars ($100). It shall be inscribed with the motto, 
"Champion Base Ball Club of the United States," with the 
name of the club and the year in which the title was won, 
and the champion club shall he entitled to fly the pennant 
until the close of the ensuing year. 

Deciding the Championship. 
SEC. 57. The championship shall be decided in the 

following manner: Within twenty-four hours after every 
match game played for the championship, the home club 
shall prepare and forward to the Secretary of the League 
a statement containing the full score of the game, accord 
ing to the system specified in the Playing Rules, together 
with the date, the place where played, the name of the 
clubs and umpire, provided that no tie or drawn game shall 
be considered a game for any purpose except the aver- 
uhI provided, further, that in any case where the 
etary shall not receive the score of a championship 
game within live days after the playing of such game, the 
club whose duty it is to forward such score shall pay to 
the League the sum of $2 as the penalty of such default. 

At the close of the' season the Secretarv shall prepare a 
tabular statement of the games won and lost by each club, 



22 

according to the statement so sent him, which statement 
shall be the sole evidence in the matter, and .submit the 
same, with the statement so sent him, to the Board, which 
shall make the award in writing, and report the same to 
the League at its annual meeting. 
In making the award the Board shall consider: 

1. The tabular statement of the Secretary. 

2. Forfeited games. 

3. Games participated in by clubs which have with- 
drawn, disbanded or forfeited their membership without 
completing their championship scries with all other League 
clubs, such games shall be counted to the following extent: 

The Board shall ascertain the least number of cham- 
pionship games played by such club with any club remain- 
ing in the League, and shall from the first game partici- 
pated in during the championship scries by such retired 
club, count in the scries of each League club a similar 
number of games, and all other games participated in by 
such retired club shall not be counted in the championship 
series. Provided, that if such retired club shall have 
failed to play at least one championship game with every 
League club, all games participated in by it shall be thrown 
out entirely. 

Meetings. 

SEC. 58. The annual meeting of the League shall be 
held on the second Tuesday in December of each year at 
two o'clock P. M. in New York City. Adjourned meet- 
ings of the annual meeting may be held at other places, 
and at such times as shall be determined by resolution of 
the National League or its Board of Directors from lime 
to time. 

SEC. 59. Special meetings may be called by the Presi- 
dent of tin- League on his own option or on the _ written 
call of six clubs, or a majority of the Board of Directors, 
at such times and places as they may from time to time 
determine. 

Club Representation. 

SEC. 60. At such meeting each club shall be repre- 
sented and shall be entitled to two representatives, and 
to have in addition thereto any of its officers or ex-officers 
present at such meetings; but no club shall he permitted to 
send as a representative any person under contract or 
engagement as a ball player or manager, and belonging to 
the nine of said club in such capacity They shall, if re- 



23 

quested by any other club representative, present a certifi- 
cate of their appointment duly attested by at least two 
officers of their club showing (heir authority to act, but no 
club shall have more than one vote. 

Executive Session. 
SEC. 61. This League may, upon a majority vote of its 
members, elect to go into executive session for the trans- 
action of its business, and during such session no club 
shall be entitled to more than two representatives. 

Quorum. 
SEC. 62. A representation of a majority of clubs shall 
constitute a quorum for the transaction of business, but a 
less number may adjourn from time to time until a quorum 
is obtained. When obtained it may be maintained by lock- 
ing the doors of the meeting room, the appointment of 
doorkeepers and such other procedures usual in parliamen- 
tary bodies to maintain quorums and dispatch business. 

Order of Business. 
SEC. 63. The following shall be the order of business 
unless suspended by a three-fourths vote of the club mem- 
bers: 

i. Reading minutes of last meeting. 

2. Report of Board of Directors. 

3. Report of Committees. 

4. Report of President. 

5. Election of New Members. 

6. Election of Officers. 

7. Amendment of Constitution. 

8. Adoption of Playing Rules, 
o. Miscellaneous Business. 

10. Adjournment. 

Amendments. 
SEC. 64. (1) The Constitution of this League may be 
altered or amended by a three-fourths vote of the League 
at any annual meeting, or by a unanimous vote at any 
other time. Provided, however, that this section and Sec- 
tions 3, 8, 0, 38, 48 shall not be altered or amended ex- 
cept by a unanimous vote of this League. (2) Any sec- 
tion of this Constitution may Ik- suspended or its provision 
made non-applicable by unanimous vote at a League 
meeting. 



CORRECT DIAGRAM OF A BALL FIELD 




Ehlakued Section Showing & 

Homk Basb. 




25 



Official Playing Rules Professional 
Base Ball Clubs 

As adopted at the meeting of the Joint Playing Rules Committee of the 

National League and the American League, held at National 

League Headquarters, New York City, March 2, 1904. 

Amended February 14, 190C; February 25, 1907; 

February 27, 1908. and February 17, 1909. 

Amendments indicated by Italics 

The Ball Ground. 

The ball ground must be enclosed. To ob- 

RULE 1. viate the necessity for ground rules, the 

shortest distance from a fence or stand on 

fair territory to the home base should be 235 feet and from 

home base to the grand stand 90 feet. 



To Lay Off the Field. 
To lay off the lines defining the location 
RULE 2. of the several bases, the catcher's and the 
pitcher's position and to establish the boun- 
daries required in playing the game of base ball, proceed as 
follows : 

Diamond or Infield. 
From a point, A. within the grounds, project a straight 
line oul into the field, and at a point, B, 154 feet from point 
A, lay off lines B C and P. D at right angles to the line 
A B; then, with B as a center and 63.63945 feet as a radius, 
describe arcs cutting the lines 1? A at F and B C at G, B D 
at 1 1 and B E at I. Draw lines F G,G E, E H, and II F, 
which said lines shall be the containing lines of the Dia- 
mond or Infield. 

The Catcher's Lines. 

With F as a center and 10 feet radius, de- 

RULE 3. scribe an arc cutting line F A at L, and 

draw lines L M and L O at right angles 

to F A, and continue same out from F A not less than 

10 feet. 



26 

The Foul Lines. 
From the intersection point, F, continue 
RULE 4. the straight lines F G and F H until they 
intersect the lines L M and L O, and then 
from the points G and J 1 in the opposite direction until 
they reach the boundary lines of the ground, and said lines 
shall be clearly visible from any part of the diamond, and 
no wood or other hard substance shall be used in the con- 
struction of such lines. 

The Players' Lines. 
With F as center and 50 feet radius, 
RULE 5. describe arcs cutting lines F O and F M 
at P and Q ; then, with F as center again 
and 75 feet radius, describe arcs cutting F G and F i 1 at 
R and S ; then, from the points P, Q, R and S draw lines 
at right angles to the lines F O, F M, 1'' G and F II. and 
continue the same until they intersect at the points '1 
and W. 

The Coachers' Lines. 

With R and S as centers and 15 feet 
RULE 6. radius, describe arcs cutting the lines R \V 

and S T at X and V and from tin- points 
X and Y draw lines parallel with the lines F II and F G, 
and continue same out to the boundary lines of the ground. 

The Three-Foot Line. 
With F as a center and 45 feet radius, 
RULE 7. describe an arc culling the line I'' G at i.and 
from I to the distance of three feet draw a 
line at right angles to F G. and marked point 2; then from 
point 2, draw a line parallel with tin- line l ; G to a point 
three feet beyond tin point G, marked 3; then from the 
point 3 draw a line at right angles to line 2, 3, back to 
and intersecting with F G, and from thence back along the 
line G F to point 1. 

The Batsman's Lines. 

On eith( of the line A F B de- 

RULE 8. scribe two parallelograms six feet long and 
four feet wide (marked ,S and 01. their 
longest side bring parallel with the line A F I!, their 
distance apart being six inches added to each end of the 
length of the diagonal of the square within the angle F, 
and the center of their length being on said diagonal. 



27 

The Pitcher's Plate. 
Section i. With point F as center and 
RULE 9. 60.5 feet as radius, describe an arc cutting 
the line F I! at line 4, and draw a line 5, 6, 
passing through point 4 and extending 12 inches on either 
side of line F 1! ; then with line 5, 6, as a side, describe a 
parallelogram 24 inches by 6 inches, in which shall be lo- 
cated the pitcher's plate. 

Sec. 2. The pitcher's plate shall not be more than 15 
inches higher than the base lines or the home plate, which 
shall be level with the surface of the field, and the slope 
from the pitcher's plate to every base line and the home 
plate shall be gradual. 



The Bases. 

Section i. Within the angle F, describe 
RULE 10. a five-sided figure, two of the sides of which 
shall coincide with the lines F G and F H 
to the extent of 12 inches each, thence parallel with the 
line F B 8j/> inches to the points X and Y, a straight line 
between which, 17 inches, will form the front of the home 
base or plate. 

Sec. 2. Within the angles at G, I and H describe 
squares, whose sides are 15 inches in length, two of such 
sides ot which squares shall lie along the lines F G and 
G I, G I and I II, I II and II F, which squares shall be 
the location of the first, second and third bases respectively. 






The Home Base at F and the Pitcher's 
RULE 11. Plate at 4 must each be of whitened rubber, 
and so fixed in the ground as to be even 
with its surface. 

The First Base at G, the Second Base 
RULE 12. at E, and the Third Base at H must each 
be a white canvas bag filled with soft ma- 
terial and securely fastened in place at the points specified 
in Rule 10. 

The lines described in Rules 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 
RULE 13. and 8 must be marked with lime, chalk or 
other white material, easily distinguishable 
from the ground or grass. 



28 

The Ball. 

Section i. The ball must weigh not less 
RULE 14. than five nor more than five and one-quar- 
ter ounces avoirdupois, and measure not 
less than nine nor more than nine and one -quarter inches 
in circumference. The Spalding National League Ball or 
the Reach American League Ball must be used in all 
games played under these rules. 

Sec. 2. Two regulation balls of the make adopted by 
the league of which the contesting clubs are members, 
shall be delivered by the home club to the umpire at or 
before the hour for the commencement of a championship 
game. If the ball placed in play be batted or thrown out 
of the grounds or into one of the stands for spectators 
or in the judgment of the umpire, become unfit for play 
from any cause, the umpire shall at once deliver the alter- 
nate ball to the pitcher and another legal ball shall be sup- 
plied to him, so that he shall at all times have in In 
trol one or more alternate balls. Provided, however, that 
all balls batted or thrown out of the ground or into a stand 
shall when returned to the field be niven into the custody 
of the umpire immediately and become alternate balls and 
so long as he has in his possession two or more alternate 
balls, he shall not call for a new ball to replace one that has 
gone out of play. The alternate balls shall become the ball 
in play in the order in which they were delivered to the 
umpire. 

Sec. 3. Immediately upon the delivery to him of the 
alternate ball by the umpire, the pitcher shall take his posi- 
tion and on the call of "Play," by the umpire, it shall be- 
come the ball in play. Provided, however, that play shall 
not be resumed with the .alternate ball when a fair batted 
ball or a ball thrown by a fielder goes out of the ground 
or into a stand for have 

completed the circuit of the bases unless compelled to stop 
at second or third base in compliance with a ground 
rule. 



The Spalding league Bull lias bean adopted by th« National League 
ror the past thirty-two years an. I I used In all toe League eonts i li 
has also been adopted by tn( . majority .,1' other professional leaffU 
by practically all thc colleges. 

For junior clubs (clubs composed of boys under 1G years of age) we 
recommend them to use thc Spalding Boys' league Hall, and that games 
Waved by junior cubs with this ball will count as legal games the same 
as if played with the Official League Hall 



29 

Discolored or Damaged Balls. 
Sec. 4. In the event of a ball being intentionally dis- 
colored by rubbing it with the soil or otherwise by any 
player, or otherwise damaged by any player, the umpire 
shall, upon appeal by the captain of the opposite side, 
forthwith demand the return of that ball and substitute for 
it another legal ball, as hereinbefore described, and impose 
a fine of $5.00 on the offending player. 

Home Club to Provide Balls. 
Sec. 5. In every game the balls played with shall be 
furnished by the home club, and the last in play shall 
become the property of the winning club. Each ball shall 
be enclosed in a paper box, which must be sealed with 
the seal of the Secretary of the League and bear his certifi- 
cate that he has examined, measured and weighed the ball 
contained therein and that it is of the required standard in 
all respects. The seal shall not be broken by the umpire 
except in the presence of the captains of the contesting 
teams after "Play" has been called. 

Reserve Balls on Field. 

Sec. 6. The home club shall have at least a dozen reg- 
ulation balls on the field during each championship game, 
ready for use on the call of the umpire. 

The Bat. 

The bat must be round, not over two and 
RULE 15. three-fourth inches in diameter at the thick- 
est part, nor more than 42 inches in length 
and entirely '>f hardwood, except that for a distance of 
iS inches from the end, twine may be, wound around or 
a granulated substance applied to the handle. 

Number of Players in a Game. 

The players of each club, actively en- 
RULE 16. gaged in a game at one time, shall be nine 
in number, one of whom shall act as cap- 
tain; and in no case shall mure' or less than nine men be 
allowed to play on a side in a game. 

Positions of the Players. 

The players may be stationed at any points 
RULE 17. of the field their captain may elect, regard- 
less of their respective positions, except 
that the pitcher, while in the act of delivering the ball to 



30 

the bat, must take his position as defined in Rules 9 and 
30; and the catcher must be within the lines of his position 
as defined in Rule 3 and within 10 feel of home base, when- 
ever the pitcher delivers the ball to the bat. 

Must Not Mingle With Spectators. 

Players in uniform shall not be permit- 
RULE 18. ted to occupy scats in the stands, or to 
mingle with the spectators. 

Uniforms of Players. 

Every club shall adopt two uniforms for 
RULE 19. its players, one to be worn in games at 
home and the other in games abroad, and 
the suits of each of the uniforms of a team shall conform 
in color and style. No player who shall attach anything 
to the sole or heel of his shoe other than the ordinary base 
ball shoe plate, or who shall appear in a uniform not con- 
forming to the suits of the other members of his team, 
shall be permitted to take part in a game. 

Size and Weight of Gloves. 

The catcher or first baseman may wear a 
RULE 20. glove or mitt of any size, shape or weight. 

Every other player is restricted to the use 
of a glove or mitt weighing not over 10 ounces and meas- 
uring not over 14 inches around the palm. 

Players' Benches. 
Section i. Players' benches must be fur- 
RULE 21. rushed by the home club and placed upon 
a portion of the ground not less than twen 
ty-fivc (25) feet outside of the players' lines. < >ne such 
bench shall be for the exclusive use of the visiting team 
and the other for the exclusive use of the home team. 
Each bench must be covered with a roof and closed at the 
back and each end; a space, however, not more than six 
(6) inches wide may be left under the roof for ventilation. 
All players and substitutes of the side at bat mtist be 
seated on their team's bench, except the batsman, base- 
runners and such as arc legally assigned t" oqactl base- 
runners. Under no circumstances shall the umpire permit 
any person except the players and substitutes in uniform 
and the manager of the team entitled to its exclusive use 
to be seated on a bench. 



31 

Penalty for Violation. 
Sec. 2. Whenever the umpire observes a violation 
of the preceding section, he shall immediately order 
such player or players as have disregarded it to be 
seated. If the order be not obeyed within one minute the 
offending player or players shall be fined $5.00 each by the 
Umpire. If the order be not then obeyed within one minute, 
the offending player or players shall be debarred from 
further participation in the game, and shall be obliged to 
forthwith leave the playing field. 

A Regulation Game. 

Every championship game must be com- 

RULE 22. menced not later than two hours before 

sunset and shall continue until each team 

has had nine innings, provided, however, that the game 

shall terminate : 

Section i. If the side first at bat scores less runs in nine 
innings than the other side has scored in eight innings. 

Sec. 2. If the side last at bat in the ninth inning scores 
the winning run before the third man is out. 

Sec. 3. If the game be called by the umpire on account 
of darkness, rain, lire, panic, or for other cause which puts 
patrons or players in peril. 

Extra-Inning Games. 

If the score be a tic at the end of nine 
RULE 23. (9) innings for each team, play shall be 
continued until one side has scored more 
runs than the other in an equal number of innings, pro- 
vided, that if the side last at bat score the winning run 
before the third man is out in any inning after the ninth, 
the game shall terminate. 



Drawn Games. 

A drawn game shall be declared by the 
RULE 24. umpire if the score is equal on the last 
even inning played when he terminates 
play in accordance with Rule 22, Section 3, after five or 
more equal innings have been played by each team. But 
if the side that went second to bat is at the bat when the 
game is terminated, and has scored the same number of 
runs as the other side, the umpire shall declare the game 
drawn without regard to the score of the last equal inning. 



82 

Called Games. 
If the umpire calls a game in accordance 
RULE 25. with Rule 22, Section j, at any lime after live 
innings have been completed, the score 
shall be that of the last equal innings played, except that 
if the side second at bat shall have scored in an unequal 
number of innings, or before the completion of the un- 
finished inning, at least one run more than the side first at 
bat, the score of the game shall be the total number of runs 
each team has made. 



Forfeited Games. 
A forfeited game shall be declared by the 
RULE 26. umpire in favor of the club not in fault, in 
the following cases: 

Section i. If the team of a club fail to appi at upon the 
field, or being upon tin field, refuse to begin a game for 
which it is scheduled or assigned, within live minutes after 
the umpire has called "Play" at the hour lor the beginning 
of the game, unless such delay in appearing, or in com- 
mencing the game, be unavoidable. 

Sec. 2. If, after the game has begun, one side refuse to 
continue to play, unless the game lias been suspended or 
terminated by the umpire. 

Sec. 3. If, after play has been suspended by the umpire, 
one side fails to resume playing in one minute after the 
umpire has called "Play." 

Sec. 4. If a team employ tactics palpably designed to 
delay the y 

Sec. 5. If, after warning by the umpire, any one of the 
rules of the game he wilfully and persistently violated. 

Ski-. 6. If the order for the removal of a player, as 
authorized by Rules 21, 58 and 64, be not obeyed within 
one minute. 

Sec. 7. If, because of the removal of players from the 
game by the umpire, or for any cause, there be less than 
nine players on either team. 

_ Sec. 8. If, when two games are scheduled to be played 
in one afternoon, the second game b 
within ten minutes of tli,. tin,,; of ih.- completion of the 
first game. 1 he umpire of the first game shall be the 
timekeeper. 

, Se £- °- In case the umpire declare the game forfeited, 
ne shall transmit a written report thereof to the president 



33 

of the League within twenty-four hours thereafter. How- 
ever, a failure on the part of the umpire to so notify the 
president shall not affect the validity of his award of the 
game by forfeiture. 

No Game. 

phi _ - "No game" shall be declared by the um- 

LE *?' P're if he terminates play in accordance with 
, Rule 22, Sec. 3, before five innings are com- 

pleted by each team. Provided, however, that if the club 
second at bat shall have made more runs at the end of 
its fourth inning than the club first at bat has made in five 
completed innings of a game so terminated, the umpire 
shall award the game to the club having made the greater 
number of runs, and it shall count as a legal game in the 
championship record. 

Substitutes. 
Section i. Each side shall be required 
RULE 28. to have present on the field during a cham- 
pionship game a sufficient number of sub- 
stitute players in uniform, conforming to the suits worn 
by their team-mates, to carry out the provisions of this 
code which requires that not less than nine players shall 
occupy the field in any inning of the game. 

Sec. 2. Any such substitute may at any stage of the 
game take the place of a player whose name is in his 
team's batting order, but the "player whom he succeeds 
shall not thereafter participate in that game. 

Sec. 3. A base-runner shall not have another player 
whose name appears in the batting order of his team run 
for him except by the consent of the captain of the other 
team. 

Choice of Innings — Fitness of Field for Play. 

The choice of innings shall be given to 
RULE 29. the captain of the home club, who shall be 
the sole judge of the fitness of the ground 
for beginning a game after a rain; but, after play has been 
called by the umpire, he alone shall be the judge as to the 
fitness of the ground for resuming play after the game has 
been suspended on account of rain, and when time is so 
called the ground-keeper and sufficient assistants shall be 
under the control of the umpire for the purpose of putting 
the ground in proper shape for play, under penalty of 
forfeiture of the game by the home team. 



34 

THE PITCHING RULES. 
Delivery of the Ball to the Bat. 

Preliminary to pitching, the pitcher shall 
RULE 30. take his position facing the batsman with 
both feet squarely on the ground and in 
front of the pitcher's plate; and in tl ■'. lb* 

ball to the bat he mus1 keep one foot in contact with the 
pitcher's plate defined in Rule 9, He shall BOl raise cither 
foot until in the act of delivering the ball to the bat, nor 
make more than one step in such deli 

A Fairly Delivered Ball. 
A fairly delivered ball is a ball pitched 
RULE 31. or thrown to the bat by the pitcher while 
standing in his position and facing the bats- 
man that passes over any portion of the horn.- base, b 
touching the ground, not lower than the b knee, 

nor higher than his shoulder. For even such fairly deliv- 
ered ball the umpire shall call one strike. 

An Unfairly Delivered Ball. 
An unfairly delivered ball is a ball dc- 
RULE 32. livered to the hat by the pitcher while 

standing in 
man that does not p my portion of the home base 

between the batsman's should) or thai touches 

the ground before passing hot truck al ' 

batsman For every unfairly I ball the umpire 

shall call one ball. 

Delaying the Game. 

riii p m ■ Section '• If, after the batsman be stand- 

MULE 33. i„g in his pr. .;. kc at 

a pitched ball, the hall be thrown by the 
pitcher to any player other than thi when in 

the catcher's lines and within 10 feet of the home base (ex- 
cept m an attempt to retire a base rannei 1. each b 
thrown shall be 1 ball. 

,. Se<; - 2. The umpire shall call a ball on the pitcher each 
time he delays the game by failing to deliver the b 
the batsman lor a longer period t! excepting 

mat at the commencement of each inning, or whi n •• i>"' '' 
cr relieves another, the pitchi 1 minute in 

aehvmng not to exceed fi\ het "r an 

"welder, during which time play shall be suspended. 



35 

Sec. 3. In event of the pitcher bring taken from the game 
by either manager or captain, the player substituted lor him 
shall continue' to pitch until the batsman then at bat has 
either been put out or has reached first base. 

Balking. 
A balk shall be: . . 

RULE 34. SECTION I. Any motion made by the 

pitcher while in position to deliver the ball 
to the bat without delivering it, or to throw to first base 
when occupied by a base runner without completing the 
throw. 

Sec. 2. Throwing the ball by the pitcher to any base to 
catch the base runner without stepping directly toward 
such base in the act of making such throw. 

Sec. 3. Any deliverv of the ball to the bat by the pitcher 
While either foot is back of the pitcher s plate. 

Sec. 4. Any delivery of the ball to the bat by the pitcher 
while he is not facing the batsman. . 

Sec 5. Any motion in delivering the ball to ' ic . b ' 1 ' by 
the pitcher while not in the position defined by Kute so- 
Sec. 6. 1 [olding of the ball by the pitcher so long as in 
the opinion of the umpire, to unnecessarily delay tne game ;. 

Sec. 7. Making any motion to pitch while standing m his 
position without having the ball in his POfsesston. 

Sec 8. Making any motion of the arm. £°f% T iW™ 
body the pitcher habitually make, in his method of delivery, 
without immediately delivering the ball to the tot. 

Sec o. Delivery of the ball to the ba when to (catcher 
is standing outside the lines of the catchers position as 
^I'piX U fail to complv with -he recuirements 
of any section of this rule, the umpire shall call a balk. 
Dead Ball. . 

A dead ball is a ball delivered to to sbtf 
RULE 35. by the pitcher, not struck at by the bats 
,,,„, tha a "y partof th« bats 

m «»' i clothing "■; Ii :i ir "'„ ni;!i'ofti^ 

or th ing or getting beyond the control o e 

catcher touches any part of the clothing or person ol tne 
umpire while he is on foul ground. 

Ball Not in Play. , 

[„case of a foul strike, foul hit ball not 

RULE 36. leJal. caught, dead ball, *g*ffi££ 

the fielder or batsman, or a "wtatMiMBn 

•ng a base runner, the ball shall not be conadered in play 



36 

until it be held by the pitcher standing in his position, and 
the umpire shall have called " Play." 



Block Balls. 

Section i. A block is a batted or thrown 
RULE 37. ball that is touched, stopped or bandied by 
a person not engaged in the game. 
bEC. 2. Whenever a block occurs the umpire shall de- 
clare it, and base runners may run the bases without liabil- 
ity to be put out until the ball has been returned to and 
held by the pitcher in his position. 

Sec. 3, If the person not engaged in the game should 
retain possession of a blocked ball, or throw or kick it 
beyond the reach of the fielders, the umpire shall call 
i lme and require each base runner to stop at the base 
last touched by him until the ball be returned to the pitcher 
in his position and the umpire shall have called •'Play." 

THE BATTING RULES. 

The Batsman's Position. 

ii player of the side at bat shall be- 
come the batsman and must take his posi- 
tion within the batsman's lines (as defined 

in Rule 8) in the order that his name appears in his team's 

batting list. 

The Order of Batting. 
Section 1. The batting order of each team 
must be delivered before the game by its cap- 
tain to the umpire, who shall submit it to the 
inspection of the captain of the other side. The batting order 
klivered to the umpire must be followed throughout the 
game unless a player be substituted for another, in which 
case the substitute must take the place in the batting order 
of the retired player. 

Sec. 2. When the umpire announces the pitcher prior 
to commencement of name, the player announced must pitch 
first base " lan has cUht:r / " r " /"'' '"" ' '" >""■ >ea<hed 

The First Batsman in an Inning. 

rui p a.n A fUr ,hc first hming the first striker in 
w. eacj, Illning s|) . ill |jc . ih h|i ma|| whose 

™ m „i . i u- !! amc fo,lows that of the last man who 
completed his time at bat ' in the preceding inning. 



RULE 38. 



RULE 39. 



37 

Players Belong on Bench. 
When a side goes to the bat its players 
RULE 41. must immediately seat themselves on the 
bench assigned to them as defined in Rule 
21, and remain there until their side is put out, except 
when called to the bat or to act as coachers or substitute 
base runners. 



Reserved for Umpire, Catcher and Batsman. 

No player of the side "at bat," except the 
RULE 42. batsman, shall occupy any portion of the 
space within the catcher's lines as defined 
in Rule 3. The triangular space back of the home base is 
reserved for the exclusive use of the umpire, catcher and 
batsman, and the umpire must prohibit any player of the 
side "at bat" from crossing the same at any time while the 
ball is in the hands of the pitcher or catcher, or passing 
between them while standing in their positions. 

Fielder Has Right of Way. 

The players of the side at bat must 
RULE 43. speedily abandon their bench and hasten 
to another part of the field when by remain- 
ing upon or near it thev or any of them would interfere 
with a fielder in an attempt to catch or handle a thrown 
or a batted ball. 

A Fair Hit. 
A fair hit is a legally batted ball that 
RULE 44. settles on fair ground between home and 
first base or between home and third base 
or that is on fair ground when bounding to the outfield 
past first or third base or that first falls on fair territory 
beyond first or third base or that, while on or over fair 
ground, touches the person of the umpire or a player. 

A Foul Hit. 

A foul hit is a legally batted ball that 
RULE 45. settles on foul territory between home and 
first base or home and third base, or that 
bounds past first or third base on foul territory or that 
falls .,,1 foul territory beyond first or third base or, whtle 
on or over foul ground, touches the person of the umpire 
or a player. 



RULE 46. 



38 

A Foul Tip. 

A foul tip is a ball batted by the bats- 
man while standing within the lines of his 
position, that goes sharp and direct from 
the bat to the catcher's hands and is legally caught. 

A Bunt Hit. 

A bunt hit is a legally batted ball, not 

RULE 47. swung at, but met with the bat and tapped 

slowly within the infield by the batsman. 

If the attempt to bunt result in a foul not legally caught, a 

strike shall be called by the umpire. 

Balls Batted Outside the Ground. 

Section i. When a batted ball passes 
RULE 48. outside the ground or into a stand the um- 
pire shall decide it fair or foul according to 
where it disappears from the umpire's view. 

Sec. 2. A fair batted ball that goes over the fence or 
into a stand shall entitle the batsman to a home run unless 
it should pass out of the ground or into a stand al a less 
distance than two hundred and thirty-five (235) feet from 
the home base, in which case the batsman shall be entitled 
to two bases only. The point at which a fence or stand 
is less than 2.35 feet from the home base shall be plainly 
indicated by a white or black sign or mark for the urn- 
pires guidance. strikes _ 

A strike is: 
RULE 49. SECTION i. A pitched ball struck at by 

the batsman without its touching his bat; or, 

Sec. 2. A fair ball legally delivered by the pitcher at 
which the batsman .lor- not strike. 

She. 3, A foul hit ball not caught on the fly unless the 
batsman has two strikes. 

Skc 4. An attempt to bunt which results in a foul not 
legally caught. 

Sec. 5. A pitched ball, at which the batsman strikes but 
misses and which totichefl any part of his person. 

Sec. 6. A foul tip, held by tin- catcher, while standing 
within the lines of his position. 

Foul Strike. 
A "Foul Strike" is a ball battel by the 
batsman when either or both of hi, feet is 



RULE 50. 



upon the ground outside the lines of the 
batimans position. 



39 

When Batsman is Out. 

The batsman is out : 
RULE 51. Section t. If he fail to take his position 

at the bat in the order in which his name 
appears nn the batting list unless the error be discovered 
and the proper batsman replace him before he become a base 
runner, in which case, the balls and strikes called must 
mnted in the time "at bat" of the proper batsman. 
But only the proper batsman shall be declared out, and 
no runs shall be scored or bases run because of any act 
of the improper batsman. Provided, this rule shall not be 
enforced unless the out be declared before the ball be de- 
livered to the succeeding batsman. Should the batsman 
declared out under this section be the third hand out and 
his side be thereby put out, the proper batsman in the next 
inning shall be the player who would have come to bat 
had the players been put out by ordinary play in the pre- 
ceding inning. 

Sec. 2. If he fail to take his position within one minute 
after the umpire has called for the batsman. 

Sec. 3. If he make a foul hit other than a foul tip, as de- 
fined in Rule 46, and the ball be momentarily held by a 
fielder before touching the ground; provided, it be not 
caught in a fielder's cap, protector, pocket or other part 
of his uniform, or strike some object other than a fielder be- 
fore being caught. 

Sfx. 4. If he make a foul strike, as defined in Rule SO. 

SEC 5. If he attempt to binder the catcher from fielding 
or throwing the ball by stepping outside the lines of the 
batsman's position, or in any way obstructing or interfer- 
ing with that pla 

SEC. o If while first base be occupied by a base runner, 
the third strike be called on him by the umpire, unless two 
men are ut. ., , . „ . 

Sec. 7. I [tempting a third strike, the ball touch 

any part of the batsman in "Inch case base run- 

ners occupying bases shall not advance as prescribed in 
Rule 55, Section 5. 

Sec. 8. If. before two hands are out. while first and 

second or first, second and third bases arc occupied, he 

hit a fiv ball, other than a line drive, that can be handled 

by an infieldcr. In such case the umpire shaU, as soon as 

.. declare it an infield or outfield hit. 

Sec 0. If the third strike be called in accordance with 
Sections 4 or 5 of Rule 49- 



40 

Sec. io. If lie steps from one batsman's box to the other 
after the pitcher has taken his position. 

BASE RUNNING RULES. 

Legal Order of Bases. 

The Base Runner must touch each base 
RULE 52. in legal order, viz., First, Second, Third 
and Home Bases; and when obliged to re- 
turn while the ball is in play, must retouch the base or 
bases in reverse order, lie can only acquire the right to a 
base by touching it, before having been put out, and shall 
then be entitled to hold such base until he has legally 
touched the next base in order, or has been legally forced 
to vacate it for a succeeding base runner. However, no 
base runner shall score a run to count in the game ahead 
of the base runner preceding him in the batting order, if 
there be such preceding base runner who has not been put 
out in that inning. 

When the Batsman Becomes a Base-Runner. 
The batsman becomes a base runner: 
RULE 53. Section i. Instantly after he makes a 

fair hit. 

Sec. 2. Instantly after "Four Balls" have been called by 
the umpire. 

Sec. 3. Instantly after "Three Strikes" have been de- 
• lared by the umpire. 

Sec. 4. If, without making any attempt to strike at the 
ball, his person or clothing be hit by a pitched ball unless, 
in the opinion of the umpire he plainly make no effort 
to get out of the way of the pitched ball 

SEC 5- I»" the catcher interfere with him in or prevent 
him from striking at a pitched ball. 

Sec. 6. If a fair hit ball strike the person or clothing of 
the umpire or a base runner on fair ground. 

Entitled to Bases. 
The base runner shall be entitled, with- 
RULE 54. out liability to be put out, to advance a base 
in the following cases : 
Sei iron i. If, while the batsman, he becomes a base 
runner by reason of "fonr balls" or for being hit by a 
pitched ball, or for being interfered with to the catcher in 
striking at a pitched ball. 



41 

Sec. 2. If the umpire awards to a succeeding batsman a 
base on four balls, or for being hit by a pitched ball, or 
being interfered with by the catcher in striking at a pitched 
ball and the base runner be thereby forced to vacate the 
base held by him. 

Sue. 3. If the umpire call a "Balk." 

Sec. 4. If a ball delivered by the pitcher pass the catcher 
and touch the umpire or any fence or building within 
ninety (yo) feet of the home base. 

Sec. 5. If he be prevented from making a base by the 
obstruction of a fielder, unless the latter have the ball in 
his hand ready to touch the base runner. 

Sec. 6. If the fielder stop or catch a batted ball with 
his cap, glove or any part of his uniform, while detached 
from its proper place on his person. 



Returning to Bases. 
The base runner shall return to his base 
RULE 55. without liability to be put out: 

Section i. If the umpire declares any foul 
not legally caught. 

Sec. 2. If the umpire declares a foul strike. 

Sec. 3, If the umpire declares a dead ball, unless it bf 
also the fourth unfair ball, and he be thereby forced to takt 
the next base, as provided in Rule SI- Section 2. 

Sec. 4. If the person or clothing of the umpire inter- 
fere with the catcher in an attempt to throw or the umpire 
be struck by a ball thrown by the catcher or other fielder 
to intercept a base runner. 

Sec. 5. If a pitched ball at which the batsman strikes 
but misses, touch any part of the batsman's person. 

Sec. 6. In anv and all of these cases the base runner is 
not required to touch the intervening bases 111 returning to 
the base he is legally entitled to. 

When Base Runners are Out. 

The base runner is out: 
RULE 56. Section 1. If. after three strikes have 

been declared against him while the batsman, 
the third strike ball be not legally caught and he plainly 
attempts to hinder the catcher from fielding the ball. 

Sec. 2. If, having made a fair hit while batsman, such 
fair hit ball be momentarily held by a fielder before touch- 
ing the ground or any object other than a fielder; pro- 



42 

srided, it be not caught in a fielder's hat, cap, protector, 
pocket or other part of his uniform. 
Sec. 3. If, when the umpire has declared "Three 

Strikes on him while the batsman, the third strike ball 
be momentarily held by a fielder before touching the 
ground; provided, it be not caught in a fielder's cap, 
protector, pocket or other part of his uniform, or touch 
some object other than a fielder before being caught 

-.if C :. 4 ' J\', * itcT , tnrcc strikcs or :i f air hit, he be touched 
with the ball in the hand of a fielder before he shall have 
touched first base. 

. SEC , 5 \ Vi after l nree strikes or a fair hit, the ball be 
securely held by a fielder while touching first base with 
any part of his person before such base runner touch first 
base. 

Sec. 6. If, in running the last half of the distance from 
home base to first base, while the ball is 1„ ed to 

hrst base, he run outside the three foot lit efined 

(Tij u 7 ' T?!,™ do so t0 avoid a nelder attempting to 
field a batted ball. 

Sec 7. If, in running from first to second base, from 
second to third base, or from third to horn run 

■nore than three feet from a direct line betweei 
.met the next one in regular or reverse order to avoid be- 
ing touched by a ball in the hands of a fielder. But in 
a neldcr be occupying a base runner's proper path in 
attempting to field a batted ball, then the base runni r shall 
• un out of direct line to the next base and behind 
fielder and shall not be declared out for so doing. 

, u*f: it. \, ■ f:ul t0 avoid a fielder attempting to field 
a batted ball, in the manner d in Sections 6 and 7 

^ J;?/ V 0r m any wa y obstruct a fielder in attempting 
LrV\> c ' lba,1 > or intentionally ii,t Kb a 

nrown baU ; provided, that if two or more fielders attempt 
to held a batted ball, and the base runner come in contact 
thlh fi e , ? T " lore ? f them > thc umpire shall determine 

SS? nnl A^A 3 I'""^" 1 "' ,h " l ""' ! '» " f *» ™le, : '" d 
litb 2 fi 1A £" b:,SC Uln,K - r '' ; " ,: 'Ct 

to L Jl' i 1 T " t]X r T , , tllan "'*' one th * ninp.re determines 
to be entitled to held such batted ball 

touch J^hv ii, at i a H y - tim . c Wi " is '" Play. 

part of hV neball ' n,; of a fielder, m 

OCCUDv • nr, ■ !T', n | b,: t ° UChin ,8 tl 

fieWc J r i ' 

K&fcS the base runner deli.- 



43 

Sec. io. If, when a fair or foal hit ball (other than a 
foul tip as defined in Rule 46) be legally caught by a 
fielder, such ball be legally held by a fielder on the base 
occupied by the base runner when such ball was batted, 
or the base runner be touched with the ball in the hands 
of a fielder, before be retouch such base after such fair or 
foul hit ball was so caught; provided, that the base runner 
shall not be out in such case, if, after the ball was legally 
caught as above, it be delivered to the bat by the pitcher 
the fielder hold it on said base, or touch the base 
runner out with it; but if the base runner, in attempting 
ch a base, detach it from its fastening before being 
i or forced out, he shall be declared safe. 

11. If, when the batsman becomes a base runner, 

the first base, or the first and second bases, or the first, 

1 anil third bases '■ a< d, any base runner so 

occupying a base shall cease to be entitled to hold it, and 

may be put out at the next base in the same manner as in 

running to first base, or by being touched with the ball in 

the hands of a fielder at any time before any base runner 

following him in the b. order be put out, unless the 

umpire should decide the hit of the batsman to be an m- 

Hv. 

Sk. ij. If a fair hit ball strike him before touching 

a fielder, and. in BUch Case, no base shall be run unless 

nan becoming a base runner, but 

no run shall be scored runner put out 

until the umpire puts the ball back into play. 

n. If. when advancing bases, or forced to return 

to a base, while th< in play, he fail to touch the 

intervening base or bases, if any. in the regular or reverse 

order, as the case may be, he may be put out by the ball 

being held by a fielder on any has- he failed to touch or 

h ,1 by the ball in the hands of a fielder 

m thi "i running to first base; proyicleti, 

ill not be out in such case it he 

ball b P« tchw h< tore the 

. ho , d |, , runner with it. 

,,. If, when the umpire call "I' r the sus- 

l touch the tase 

hen "Time" was called before touching the 

, provided, the base numer shall not be out. in 

delivered .-the bat b> he 

• hold it on said base or touch the 

base runner with it. 



44 

Sec. 15. If with one or no one out and a base runner on 
third base, the batsman interferes with a play being made 
at home plate. 

Sec. 16. If he pass a base runner who is caught between 
two bases, he shall be declared out immediately upon pass- 
ing the preceding base runner. 

Overrunning First Base. 

Sec. 17. The base runner in running to first base may 
overrun said base after touching it in passing without in- 
curring liability to be out for being off said base, pro- 
vided he return at once and retouch the base, after which 
he may be put out as at any other base. If, after over- 
running first base, he turn in the direction of or attempt 
to run to second base, before returning to first base, he 
shall forfeit such exemption from liability to be put out. 

Sec. 18. If, before two hands are out and while third 
base is occupied, the coacher stationed near that base shall 
run in the direction of home base on or near the base line 
while a fielder is making or trying to make a play on a 
batted ball not caught on tin- fly, or on a thrown ball, and 
thereby draws a throw to home base, the base runner en- 
titled to third base shall he declared out by the umpire 
for the coacher's interference with and prevention of the 
legitimate play. 

Sec. 19. If one or more members of the team at bat 
stand or collect at or around a base for which a base 
runner is trying, thereby confusing the fielding side and 
adding to the difficulty of making such play, the base run- 
ner shall be declared out for the interference of his team 
mate or team mates. 

Sec. 20. If ho touch home base before a base runner pre- 
ceding him in the batting order, if there be such preceding 
base runner, lose his right to third base. 

When Umpire Shall Declare an Out. 

The umpire shall declare the batsman or 
RULE 57. base runner out, without waiting for an ap- 
peal for such decision, in all cases where 
such player be put out in accordance with any of these 
rules, except Sections 13 and 17 of Rule 56. 

Coaching Rules. 
The coacher shall be restricted to coach- 
RULE 58. ing th c base runner only, and shall not 
address remarks except to the base runner, 
and then only in words of assistance and direction in run 



45 

ning bases. lie shall not, by words or signs, incite or try 
to incite the spectators to demonstrations, and shall not 
use language which will in any manner refer to or reflect 
upon a player of the opposite club, the umpire or the spec- 
tators. Not more than two coachers, who must be players 
in the uniform of the team at bat, shall be allowed to oc- 
cupy the space between the players' and the coachers' lines, 
one near first and the other near third base, to coach base 
runners. If there be more than the legal number of coach- 
ers or this rule be violated in any respect the captain of 
the opposite side may call the attention of the umpire to 
the offense, and thereupon the umpire must order the il- 
legal coacher or coachers to the bench, and if his order 
be not obeyed within one minute, the umpire shall assess a 
fine of $5.00 against each offending player, and upon a 
repetition of the offense, the offending player or players 
shall be debarred from further participation in the game, 
and shall leave the playing field forthwith.' 
The Scoring of Runs. 
One run shall be scored every time a 
RULE 59. base runner, alter having legally touched 
the first three bases, shall legally touch the 
home base before three men are put out; provided, how- 
ever, that if he reach home on or during a play in which 
the third man be forced out or be put out before reaching 
first base, a run shall not count. A force-out can be made 
only when a base runner legally loses the right to the base 
he occupies and is thereby obliged to advance. 

UMPIRE AND HIS DUTIES. 
Power to Enforce Decisions. 

The umpire is the representative of the 
RULE 60. League and as such is authorized and re- 
quired to enforce each section of this code. 
He shall have the power to order a player, captain or man- 
ager to do or omit to do any act which in his judgment is 
necessary to give force and effect to one or all of these 
rules, and to inflict penalties for violations of the rules as 
hereinafter prescribed. 

There shall be no appeal from any de- 
RULE 61. cision of the umpire on the ground that he 
was not correct in his conclusion as to 
whether a batted ball was fair or foul, a base runner safe 
or out, a pitched ball a strike or ball, or on any other 
play involving accuracy of judgment, and no decision ren- 



46 

dered by him shall be reversed, except that he be con- 
vinced that it is in violation of one of these rules. The 
captain shall alone have the right to protest against a 
decision and seek its reversal on a claim that it is in con- 
flict with a section of these rules. 

Must Not Question Decisions. 

Under no circumstances shall a captain 
RULE 62. or player dispute the accuracy of the um- 
pire's judgment and decision on a play. 

Clubs Can Not Change Umpire. 

The umpire can not be changed during a 
RULE 63. championship game by the consent of the 
contesting clubs unless the official in charge 
of the field be incapacitated from service by injury or ill- 
ness. 

Penalties for Violations of the Rules. 

In all cases of violation of these rules, by 
RULE 64. either player or manager, the penalty shall 
be prompt removal of the offender from the 
game and grounds, followed by a period of such suspension 
from actual service in the club as the President of the League 
may fix. In the event of removal of player or manager by 
the umpire, he shall go direct to the club house and remain 
there during progress of the game, or leave the grounds; 
and a failure to do so will warrant a forfeiture of Hie game 
by the umpire, [This rule shall be mandatory in the major 
leagues, but in minor leagues and in anialcur contests a 
fining system may be substituted.'] 

Umpire to Report Violations of the Rules. 

The umpire shall within twelve hours 
RULE 65. after fining or removing a player from the 
game, forward to the president a report of 
the penalty inflicted and the cause therefor. 

Immediately upon being informed by the 
RULE 66. umpire that a fine has been imposed upon 
any manager, captain or player, the presi- 
dent shall notify the person so fined and also the club of 
which he is a member; and, in the event of the failure of 
the person so fined to pay to the secretary of the League 
the amount of said fine within five days after notice, he 
shall be debarred from participating ii mpionship 

game or from sitting on a player's bench during the prog- 
ress of a championship game until such fine be paid. 



47 

When the offense of the player debarred 
RULE 67. from the game be of a flagrant nature, 
such as the use oi obscene language or an 
assault upon a player or umpire, the umpire shall within 
four hours thereafter forward to the president of the 
League full particulars. 

Warning to Captains. 
The umpire shall notify both captains be- 
RULE 68. fore the game, and in the presence of each 
oilier, that all the playing rules will be- 
strictly and impartially enforced, and warn them that fail- 
ure on their part to co-operate in such enforcement will 
result in offenders being fined, and, if necessary to pre- 
serve discipline, debarred from the game. 

On Ground Rules. 

Before the commencement of a game the 
RULE 69. umpire shall see that the rules governing 
all the materials of the game are strictly 
observed, lie shall ask the captain of the home club 
whether there are any special ground rules, and if there 
be he shall acquaint himself with them, advise the cap- 
tain of the visiting team of their scope and see that each 
is duly enforced, provided that it does not conflict with 
any of these rules, and are acceptable to the captain of tin- 
visiting, tea in. If the latter object to a proposed ground 
rule, the umpire shall have authority to adopt or reject it. 

Official Announcements. 
The umpire shall call "Play" at the hour 
RULE 70. appointed for the beginning of a game, an- 
nounce "Time" at i|s legal interruption 
and declare "Game" at its legal termination. 

Suspension of Play. 

The umpire shall suspend play for the 
RULE 71. following causes: 

I. If rain fall so heavily as to cause the 
spectators on the open field and opi n ek shelter, 

in which case he shall note the time i ension, and 

should rain fall continuously for thirty minutes thereafter 
he shall terminate the game. 

z. In case of an accident which incapacitates him or a 
player from service in the field, or in order to remove 
from the grounds any player or spectator who has violated 



RULE 73. 



48 

the rules, or in case of fire, panic or other extraordinary 
circumstances. 

Call of Time. 

Bin p 70 ,, In sus .l' l ' ,1, |'"K Play from any legal cause 
rule 72. the umpire shall call 'Time"; when he calls 
., .,„, ., "!'mc." play shall be suspended until he 
calls Play again, and daring the interim no player shall 
be put out base be run or run be scored. "Time" shall 
not be called by the umpire until the ball be held by the 
pitcher while standing in his position. 

Decisions on Balls and Strikes. 

, The umpire shall call and count as a 
ball any unfair ball delivered by the 

pitcher to the batsman. He shall also call 
and count as a 'strike" any fairly delivered ball which 
passes over any portion of the home base, and within the 
batsman s legal range as defined in Rule 31, whether struck 
at or not by the batsman ; or a foul tip which is caught 
by the catcher standing within the lines of his position 
within 10 feet of the home base; or which, after being 
struck at and not hit, strike the person of the batsman- 
or «hen the ball be bunted foul by the batsman; or any 
foul hit ball not caught on the fly unless the batsman lias 
two strikes, provided, however, that a pitch, d ball shall 
not be called or counted a "ball" or "strike" by the um- 
pire until it has passed the home plate. 

riii f -7A ¥ I 5 " 1 one um P ir c be assigned, his duties 

ULL '*• and jurisdiction shall extend to all points. 

and he shall be permitted to take his stand 

in any part of the field that in his opinion will best enable 

nun to discharge his duties. 



RULE 75. 



Field Rules. 
No person shall be allowed upon any 
part of the field during the progress of a 
m™ t g , ame , exce P* 'he players in uniform, the 

manager of each side, the umpire, such officer of tin 
^ a V' Present in uniform, and such watchmen of the 
Home club as may be necessary to preserve the peace. 

RULF 7R 1 No mana g cr - captain or pi tD ad- 

/d. d ress tnc spectator during a gamt cxcept 

the nmo.r„ce '" rcp -7°, a request for information about 
tne progress or state of the game. 



49 

Every club shall furnish sufficient police 
RULE 77. force to preservi order upon its own 
grounds, and III the event of a crowd enter- 
ing tile field during the progress of a game, and interfer- 
ing with the play in any manner, tin- visiting ■•lull may 
refuse to play until the field be cleared. If the field be not 
cleared within 15 minutes thereafter, the visiting club may 
claim and shall lie entitled t" the game by a score of nine 
runs to none (no matter what number of innings has 
been played). 

General Definitions. 

"Play" is the order of the umpire to be- 
RULE 78. gin the game or to resume it after its sus- 
pension. 

"Time" is the order of the umpire to sus- 
RULE 79. pend play. Such mi pension must not ex- 
tend beyond the day. 

"Game" is the announcement of the um- 
RULE 80. pirc that the game is terminated. 

"An inning" is tin- term at bat of the 
RULE 81. nine players representing a club in a ; 

anil is completed when three of such plaj 
ers have been legally put out. 

"A Time at Bat" is the term at bat of a 
RULE 82. batsman. It begins when he takes his po- 
sition, and continues until he is put out 
or becomes a base runner. But a time at bat shall not bi 
charged against a batsman who is awarded firsl base by the 
umpire i"i' being hit by a pitched ball, or on called balls, or 
when he makes a sacrifice hit. or for interference by the 
catcher. 

"Legal" or "Legally" signifies as required 
RULE 83. by these rules. 



THE SCORING RULES. 

To promote uniformity in scoring cham- 
RULE 84. pionship games the following instructions 

are given and suggestions and definitions 
for the guidance of scorers, and they are required to 
make all scores in accordance therewith. 






50 

The Batsman's Record. 

Section i. The first item in the tabu- 

RULE 85. lated score, after the player's name and 

position, shall be the number of times he 

has been at bat during the game, but the exceptions made 

in Rule !Sj must not be included. 

Sec. 2. In llie second column shall be set down the runs, 
if any, made by each player. 

Sec. 3. In the third column shall be placed the first base 
hits, if any, made by each player. 

The Scoring of Base Hits. 

Sec. 4. A base hit shall be scored in the following cases : 

When the ball from the bat strikes the ground on or 
within the foul lines and out of the reach of the fielders. 

When a fair-hit ball is partially or wholly stopped by 
a fielder in motion, but such player can not recover himself 
in time to field the ball to first before the striker reaches 
that base or to force out another base runner. 

When the ball be hit with such force to an infielder or 
pitcher that he can not handle it in time to put out the 
batsman or force out a base runner. In a case of doubt 
over this class of hits, a base hit should be scored and 
the fielder exempted from the charge of an error. 

When the ball is hit so slowly toward a fielder that he 
cannot handle it in time to put out the batsman or force 
out a base runner. 

In all cases where a base runner is retired by being hit 
by a batted ball, unless batted by himself, the batsman 
should be credited with a base hit. 

When a batted ball hits the person or clothing of the 
umpire, as defined in Rule 53, Section 6. 

In no case shall a base hit be scored when a base runner 
is forced out by the play. 

Sacrifice Hits. 

Sec. 5. Sacrifice hits sliall be placed in the Summary . 

A sacrifice hit shall be credited to the batsman who 
when no one is nut or when but one man is out. advances 
a runner a base by a bunt hit, which results in the batsman 
being put out before reaching first, or would so result if 
it were handled without error. 

A sacrifice hit shall also be credited to a batsman who, 
when no one is out or when but one man is out, hits a fly 
ball that is caught but results in a run being scored, or 
would in the judgment of the scorer so result if caught. 



51 

Fielding Records. 

Sec. 6. The number of opponents, if any, put out by 
each player shall be set down in the fourth column. Where 
the batsman is given 'out by the umpire for a foul strike, 
or fails to bat in proper order, or is declared out on third 
bunt strike, the put-out shall be scored to the catcher. In 
cases of the base runner being declared "out'' for interfer- 
ence, running out of line, or on an infield fly, the "out" 
should be credited to the player who would have made 
the play but for the action of the base runner or the an- 
nouncement of the umpire. 

Sec. 7. The number of times, if any, each player assists 
in putting out an opponent shall be set down in the fifth 
column. An assist should be given to each player who 
handles the ball in aiding in a run out or any other play 
of the kind, except the one who completes it. 

An assist should be given to a player who makes a play 
in time to put a runner out, even if the player who could 
complete the play fail, through no fault of the assisting 
player. 

And generally an assist should be given to each player 
who handles or assists in any manner in Dandling the 
ball from the time it leaves the bat until it reaches the 
player who makes the put-out, or in case of a thrown 
ball, to each player wdio throws or handles it cleanly, and 
in such a way that a put-out results, or would result ii 
no error were made by a team-mate. 

Assists should Ik- credited to every player who handles 
the ball in the play which results in a base runner being 
called "out" for interference or for running out of line. 

A double play shall mean any two continuous put outs 
that take place between the time the ball leaves the pitcher ' s 
hands until it is returned to him again standing in the 
pitcher's box. 

Errors. 

Sec. 8. An error shall be given in the sixth column 
for each misplay which prolongs the time at bat of the 
batsman or allows a base runner to make one or more 
bases when perfect play would have insured his being put 
out. But a base on balls, a base awarded to a batsman by 
being struck by a pitched bull, an illegal pitch, a balk, a 
passed ball or zvild pitch, unless such wild pitch or passed 
ball be on the third strike and allow the baiter to reach first 
base, shall not be included in the sixth column. In case of 
a wild pitch or a passed ball allowing the batter to reach 



52 

first base, the pitcher or the catcher, as the case may be, shall 
be charged with an error. 

An error shall not be charged against the catcher for a 
wild throw in an attempt to prevent a stolen base, unless 
the base runner advance an extra base because of the error. 

An error shall not be scored against the catcher or an 
infielder who attempts to complete a double play, unless 
the throw be so wild that an additional base be gained. 

In case a base runner advance a base through the failure 
of a baseman to stop or try to stop a ball accurately thrown 
to his base, the latter shall be charged with an error and 
not the player who made such throw, provided there was 
occasion for it. If such throw be made to second base the 
scorer shall determine whether the second baseman or 
shortstop shall be charged with an error. 

In event of a fielder dropping a fly but recovering the ball 
in time to force a runner at another base, he shall be exempted 
from an error, the play being scored as a " force-out." 

Stolen Bases. 

Sec. 9. A stolen base shall be credited to the base run- 
ner whenever he advances a base unaided by a base hit, a 
put-out, a fielding or a battery error, subject to the follow- 
ing exceptions : 

In event of a double steal being attempted from bases cue 
and two to bases two and three, where either is thrown out, 
the other shall not be credited with a stolen base. 

In event of a base runner being touched out after sliding 
over a base, he shall not be regarded as having stolen the 
base in question. 

In event of a base runner making his start la steal a base 
prior to a battery error, he shall be credited -with a stolen 
base. 

In event of a palpable muff of a ball thrown by the catcher, 
■when the base runner is clearly blocked, the infielder mak- 
ing the muff shall be charged with an error and the base 
runner shall not be credited with a stolen base. 



The Summary. 

The Summary shall contain : 
RULE 86. SECTION I. The score made in each in- 

ning of the game and the total runs of each 
side in the game. 

Sec. 2. The number of stolen bases, if any, by each 
player. 



53 

Sec. 3. The number of sacrifice hits, if any, made by each 
player. 

Sec. I. The number of sacrifice flies, if any, made by 
each player. 

Sec. S, The number of two-base hits, if any, made by 
each player. 

Sec, 6. The number of three-base hits, if any, made by 
each player. 

Sec. 7. The number of home runs, if any, made by each 
player. 

Sec. 8. The number of double and triple plays, if any, 
made by each club and the players participating in same. 

Sec. 9. The number of innings each pitcher pitched in. 

Sec. 10. The number of base hits, if any, made off each 
pitcher and the number legal at bats scored against each 
pitcher. 

Sec. 11. The number of times, if any, the pitcher strikes 
out the opposing batsmen. 

Sec. 12. The number of times, if any, the pitcher gives 
bases on balls. 

Sec. 13. The number of wild pitches, if any, charged 
against the pitcher. 

Sec. 14. The number of times, if any, the pitcher hits a 
batsman with a pitched ball, the name or names of the bats- 
man or batsmen so hit to be given. 

Sec. 15. The number of passed balls by each catcher. 

Sec. 16. The time of the game. 

Sec. 17. The name of the umpire or umpires. 



54 
Index to Rules 



TO LAY OFF THE FIELD. Sec. 

The ground 

Diamond or infield 

Catcher's linos 

Foul lines 

Players' lines 

Coachers' lines 

Three-foot line 

Batsman's lines 

Pitcher's plate 

Slope of inlleld from pitcher's plate 2 

The liases 2 

Material of 

The home base — shape and size of 1 

Material of 

Marking the lines — material of 

The ball 

Weight and size 

Make to be used 



1 
1 

Number to be delivered to umpire. 2 

2 
2 

s 

4 

0-6 



To be rep]; I if rendered iiu'it for play. 

Return of those batted or thrown out of grounds 

Alternate — when to lie placed in play 

Penalty for Intentional discoloring 

Furnished by home club 

The hat — material and size of 



THE PLAYERS AND TIIEIR POSITIONS. 

Number of players in the game 

Players' positions 

The pitcher's position 

Must not mingle with spectators 

Uniforms and shoes 

Size and weight of gloves 

Players' benches ■ 

Umpires not to wait for notice from captains 



THE REGULATION GAME. 

Time of commencing championship games 

Number of innings 

Termination of game 1-2-3 

Termination of game before completion of iifth inning 

Extra innings game ■ 

Drawn ga me 

Called game 

Forfeited game 

Failure of a club to appear 1 

Refusal of a club to continue play 2 

Failure of a club to resume play 3 

Resorting to dilatory laeties 4 

Wilfully violating teles 5 

Disobeying order to remove player 6 

Less than nine players 7 

See. u q begin ten minutes after completion of 

first 8 

If Held be not cleared in fifteen minutes 

When groundkeeper is under umpire's control 

I'uipire to make written report of forfeiture 9 

No game 

Substitutes 1 

Maj lake place of player tit any time 2 

Base runner — consent of opposing captain necessary... 3 



Rule. 
1 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
9 
10 
12 
10 

11 

13 
14 

14 
14 
14 
14 
II 
14 
14 
14 
15 



16 
17 
30 
18 
1'.) 
20 
21 
21 



22 
22 
22 
27 
n:i 
21 
25 
26 
20 
20 
26 
26 
26 

26 

26 

26 
77 
29 
26 
27 
28 
28 
28 



55 

Sec. Rule. 

Choice of innings — fitness of field for play 29 

Pitching rules: 

Delivery of the ball to bat 30 

A fairly delivered ball 31 

An unfairly delivered ball 32 

Penalty for delay by throwing to bases 1 33 

Penalty for delay in delivery to batsman 2 33 

Balking: 

Failure to deliver ball after making motion 1 34 

Failure to step toward base before throwing 2 34 

Delivery of ball while foot Is back of plate 3 34 

Delivery of hail while not facing batsman 4 34 

Motion to deliver ball while not In position 5 34 

Delaying game by holding ball 6 34 

Motion to pitch without having ball 7 34 

Any habitual motion without delivery of ball to hat.. 8 34 

Delivery of ball while catcher is outside of his lines. . 9 34 

Dead ball — bitting batsman in position or umpire on foul 

ground 35 

Ball not In play 36 

Block bulls: 

Touched or stopped by person not in game 1 37 

Umpire to declare block 2 37 

Base runners to stop under certain conditions 3 37 

TUB BATTING ROLES. 

Batsman's position 

Order of batting 39 

First batsman In each inning 40 

Players of side at baa belong on bench 41 

Not to invade space reserved (or umpire, catcher or 

batsm-an 42 

To vacate bench to prevent interference with Holder 43 

A fair hit ** 

A foul hit 45 

A foul tip 48 

A bunt hit « 

Infield fly- definition of 8 61 

Balls batted outside ground: 

Fair hit over fence or into stand 1 48 

Fair or foul -where last seen by umpire 1 43 

Batsman entitled to home run 2 48 

Strikes: 

Ball struck at by batsman 49 

Fair ball not struck at 2 49 

Foul hit not caught on fly unless batsman has two 

strikes 3 49 

Attempt to bunt resulting In foul 4 49 

Missed strike but which touches batsman 6 49 

Foul tip held by catcher. . . 6 49 

A foal strike BO 

THE BATSMAN IS OUT. 

If he fail to take position in proper turn 1 61 

If he fall to take position within one minute 2 fil 

If he make, foul hit other than foul tip anil ball Is cangbt. 3 61 

If he make foul strike 4 61 

if be Interfere with catcher 6 61 

If with first base occupied, three strikes nre called 6 61 

If! while attempting third strike, ball touch his person.... 7 61 

If] before tWO are OUt, he hits intleld fly 8 61 

If third strike is called in accordance with Sec. 4 or 5 of 

Rub- 4!> » 61 

If be step from one box to other 10 61 



56 

THE BASE-RUNNING RULES. Sec. Rule. 

Legal order of ■ bam 63 

Not to score before runner preceding !!!!!!! '.'.'.'.', !! 63 

Batsman becomes base runner: 

After be make* fall bit 1 61 

After tour balls are called 2 o : i 

After three strikes are called M 

If he be hit by pitched ball 4 (£> 

If catcher Interfere with him 5 

If fair hit strike umpire or base runner..'!!..!!!!!!!! b 51 

Entitled to bases (without liability to be nut out)- 

If umpire cull four balls 1 54 

If umpire award batsman first base for being 'h'i't"i>y 

pitched ball ' j -. 

If umpire award batsman first base for Interference' of 

catcher . ... 

If umpire award next batsman first 'base.'.* '.'.'. 2 ru 

If umpire call a •'balk" 3 j(? 

If Pitched ball pass catcher and hit umpire.'! " '.'. ! " ! 4 54 

If prevented from advancing by fielder's obstruction.. 5 54 

If ilelder stop or catch ball Illegally u 64 

Returning to bases (without liability to be put out)! 

If umpire declare any foul not legally caught 1 65 

If umpire declare foal strike 2 v. 

If umpire declare dead ball J g« 

if umpire Interfere with catcher or throw..'.'. 4 55 

If pitched ball struck at touches batsman 5 55 

When not required to touch Intervening bases 65 

Base runners are out: 

Attempt to hinder catcher after three strikes 1 58 

Holder bold fair hit i «« 

Third strike held by fielder t SJ2 

Touched with ball after three strikes.. 4 59 

Ilelder touches first base ahead of runner 58 

gunning out of three-foot lines 8 B 8 

Banning out .if line after having reached first!!!!!!.'! 7 56 

Jallure to avoid Be r In act of fielding ball 8 58 

t, i'i ,"'' - v '''-ldcr having ball it ssessloo 9 58 

Ban held on base before runner can retain 10 58 

Forced to vacate base by succeeding runner 11 58 

tilt i>y fair ball before touching Ilelder 12 56 

Failure to tooch bases in regular or reverse order 13 68 

Failure to return to»base held when "time" was called 11 68 

, r '"""" nterferj with play at home plate 15 56 

lasslng preceding base runner 16 66 

Overrunning first I ,, ,7 „j: 

toacher drawing throw to pUte. ...... ..,'.'.'.'.'.'.,'.,'.'. 18 66 

Memh.rs of team at bat confusing fielding side 19 66 

nmnir?. . 1 ',' " K '"""" be,ore Preceding ru r 20 66 

oSchiug frute? " " Ui """" •'"' , '"" 1 r '"' ' l "" i '""" " 

Scoring of runs ".'.'.'.'.'.'.'. £2 

Definition of .-, -f„ ,.,.,. .,„ lt -V '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. '.! !!!!! \ .'. 59 

Tin; DMPIBB AND HIS DIXIES. 

lower to enforce decisions on 

No appeal fmm decision... JjT 

r!m",t",n!."s.'; '"' s rtg . b< ■ ruVtioi.'. '.'.'.' :: Si 

•.a o question umpire's accuracy of judgment 62 

ssSrOT^as -p-w-s 1 

' re hours """ """"' " r '''■»'»«l"of" i,i,iy;.r' within ij " 

Notification of ones' „',;,: ttoi' of 'payment! ::::;::::::::::: : : m 



57 



Set , Rule. 

Umpire's report on flagrant cases 67 

Warning to captains 68 

Ground rules and materials of the game 69 

Official announcements 70 

Suspension of pi ty 71 

Call of "time" 72 

Decisions on halls and strikes 73 

Position of umpire on flehl 74 

FIELD RDLES. 

Persons allowed on field other than players and umpire 75 

Spectators shall not he addressed 76 

Police protection 77 

GENERAL DEFINITIONS. 

"Play" 78 

"Time" 79 

'Game" 80 

"An Inning" 81 

"A time at hat" 83 

"Legal" or "legally" 83 

HIE SCORING RDLES (Rule 84). 

The hatsman's record: 

Times at bat 1 88 

Numher of runs 2 86 

First base hits S 85 

When base hits should be credited 4 8B 

Sacrifice hits S 8(1 

Tbe fielding record : 

Number of put outs, and explanation of 8 88 

Numher of assists, and explanation of 7 85 

Errors, and explanation of 8 85 

Exemption from errors 8 85 

Scorer to determine 8 85 

Stolen liases 8 85 

The summary: 

The score of each Inning and total runs 1 86 

The comber of stolen bases 2 86 

The number of sacrifice bits 3 86 

Tbe Dumber of sacrifice Hies 4 86 

Mb.- Dumber of two-base bits 5 86 

The Dumber of three-base bits 6 86 

of home runs 7 86 

The number of double and triple plays 8 so 

Tbe Dumber oi Innings each pitcher pitched In fi 8« 

The Dumber of ba e hits made "ir each pitcher 10 86 

The numbW "f strike outs 11 86 

The Dumber of bases on balls 12 86 

The number of wild pitches 13 86 

The numher of hit batsmen It 86 

The number of passed halls 15 86 

The time of the game 16 86 

The name of the umpire or umpires 17 88 



58 

Annual Meeting of the National 

League of Professional 

Base Ball Clubs 

Held at Waldorf-Astoria, New York City, 
December 8, 9, 10 and 1 r, 1908. 

FIRST DAY, Tuesday, December 8, 1908. 

Meeting called to order at 2 P. M. 

Harry C. Pui.liam, President, in chair; John A. 
Hf.vdler, Secretary; T. M. James, Stenographer. 

Present : 

GEORGE B. DoVEY, representing the Boston National 
League Base Ball Company. 

Charles II. Ebbets, Henry Medicus and C. II. Ehiiets, 
Jr., representing the Brooklyn Ball Club. 

Charles W. Murphy, representing the Chicago League 
Ball Club. 

August Herrmann and Max C. FleiscHMANN, repre- 
senting the Cincinnati Exhibition Company. 

W. J. Shettsline, D. LeRoy Reeves, James Potter, 
Andrew STEVENSON and I. HYNEMAN, representing the 
Philadelphia Ball Company. 

Barney Dreyfcss and Will Locke, representing the 
Pittsburg Athletic Company. 

M. S. RoBlSON, representing the American Base Ball 
and Athletic Exhibition Company of St. Louis. 

The Board of Directors submitted its report, which was 
approved. 

The Pre idenl read hi- Annual Report. 
Mr. Harry C. Pulliam was re-elected as President of the 
League. 

Mr. John A. Heydler was re-elected as Secretary-Treas- 
urer. 



59 

Messrs. Dreyfuss, Ebbets, Herrmann, Murphy and 
Dovcy were elected to constitute the Hoard of Directors 
for the ensuing year. 

Recess until 2 P. M., December 9. 



SECOND DAY, Wednesday, December 9, 1908. 

League called to order 2:30 P. M. 

All clubs but New York represented. 

The following Resolution, drawn by Messrs. F.hbets, 
Murphy and Dovey, was adopted and ordered engrossed: 

"Resolved, thai in the recent -hath of HENRY CHAD- 
WICK, at Brooklyn, professional base ball losl an honored 
and true friend, who had dedicated his long, busy and use- 
ful life lo the promotion, improvement ami fostering the 
national game, and 

"Whereas, the deceased being known as the "Father of 
Rase Hall," as well as an honorary member of the National 
League, those present at this meeting desire lo pay tribute 
to his memory and to send expression of condolence to 
those nearest and dearest to Mr. Ckadwick; and 

"Whereas, he did much to uplift and to use his facile 
pen to keep the sport clean and pure, we each feel that in 
his death we have sustained a distinct personal loss, now, 
therefore, be it 

"Resolved, that this Resolution be spread upon the 
minutes of our meeting and a copy thereof forwarded to 

the widow and other relative- of the deceased." 

Mr. James A. Hart, honorary member, addressed the 

League. 

Messrs. Powers. O'Brien and Killilea, representing the 

Eastern League and American Hon, appeared before 

the League. 
Recess until 2 P. M., December 10. 



60 

THIRD DAY, Thursday, December 10, 1908. 

League called to order at 2 P. M. 

All clubs represented but New York. 

Messrs. Ryder and Lanigan, representing the SportLg 
Writers' Association of America, appeared before the 
League. 

Au appropriation was voted to complete the fund for the 
erection of a monument to Henry Chadwick and to care 
for his grave for all time. 

Messrs. Herrmann, Dreyfuss and Totter presented the 
following Resolution on the death of Frank Del lass 
Robison, which was adopted and ordered engrossed : 



Death has invaded our own household. Tt is only 
a -.hurt time ago since we had in our midst at tl 
meetings a gentleman who bad been identified with 

the National League tot many years; whose counsel 
and advice was at all times for the best interests of 
all. Frank Del lass Robison is with us no more. 
The death summons came suddenly. We have lost 
not only a careful adviser and counselor, but a 
lovable companion and friend. To the bereaved 
family the National Le its 

deepest sympathy, and it is for that reason we 
recommend that this little expression on the part 
of the League be appropriately inscribed on our 
records; that it be l. and the President of 

the League be directed to transmit the same to the 
family of the decea 



The following committees were appoint 
Schedule— Messrs. Ebbcts, Dreyfuss, Pulliam. 
Constitution — Messrs. Herrmann, Dovey, Loci 
Playing Rules— Messrs. Pulliam, Murray, lleydlcr. 



61 

Uniform Tickets of Admission — Messrs. 
Knowles, Locke 
Telegraph Contracts- Messrs. Ebbets, Locke, Heydler. 



Ebbets, 



The League had the pleasure of a visit from the dele- 
gates of the American League, also in session in New 
York City. Short addresses in spirit of friendliness and 
co-operation were made by President Johnson and Messrs. 
Comiskey, Shibe, Noyes, Navin, McBreen, Farrell, Bruce, 
Kilfoyl and Hedges, of the American League, and re- 
sponded to by the President and all club representatives 
of the National League. 

The League went into executive session. 

Recess until ia o'clock noon, December II. 



FOURTH DAY, Friday, December ii, 1908. 

Called to order at 12 o'clock. 

All clubs represented. 

The League continued in executive sessioti, at close of 
which a statement was issued giving the action taken on 
President Pulliam's report of the attempted bribery of a 
League umpire, 

Adjourned, subject to call of Chair. 

After adjournment a meeting of the Hoard of Directors 
held. 



62 

Reconvened Annual Meeting of the 

National League of Professional 

Base Ball Clubs 

Held at Auditorium Annex, Chicago, 
February 16, 17 and 18, 1909. 

President H. C. PuLLiAMandMr. Geo. B. DovEYin chair; 
Johm A. IIeyuler, Secretary; T. M. James, stenographer. 

Present : 

Geo. I'.. Dovey, representing the Boston National League 
Base Ball Company. 

Chaki.es II. Ebbets and II. W. Medicus, representing 
the Brooklyn Ball Club. 

Chari.es W. Murphy, representing the Chicago League 
Ball Club. 

August Herrmann and Tiios. J. Logan, representing 
the Cincinnati Exhibition Company. 

Wm. J. Shettsli.ne, representing the Philadelphia Ball 
Company. 

Will Locke, representing the Pittsburg Athletic Com- 
pany. 

M. S. Robison, representing the American Base Ball and 
Athletic Exhibition Company of St. Louis. 

Mr. Ebbets, from Committee on Schedule, presented the 
1909 Playing Schedule, which was unanimously adopted. 

'1 he National Agr< 1 amended, was ratified. 

All papers in of the attempted umpire bribery 

were referred to the National Commission. 

President Johnson of the American League, by invita- 
tion, attended the meeting. 

President Pulliam's request for extended leave of 
absence to recover his health was granted, Secretary J. A. 
Heydler being appointed acting president, with representa- 
tion on National Commission. 



63 

The amended Tlaying Rules, as adopted by the Joint 
Rules Committee, were presented. 

The Committee on Chadwick Memorial, through Chair- 
man Ebbets, made full report of the plans for erection of 

the monument, as well as for the unveiling exercises April 

20, I9O9. 

At 6 P. M., Thursday, February 18, the League ad- 
journed subject to call of chair. 



IN MEMORIAM 



jfranfe 2Dei^a££ iRobtson 

PRESIDENT CLEVELAND CLUB 
1887-1899 

PRESIDENT ST. LOUIS CLUB 
1900 - 1907 



Died September 25, 1908 



PEACE TO HIS ASHES 



IN MEMORIAM 



$enrp Cljafctmcfe 

FATHER OF BASE BALL' 
Died April 20, 1908 



HE BUILDED BETTER THAN 
HE KNEW " 



66 

Officers and Members 

The following is an official list of the Officers of the 
National League of Professional Base Hall Clubs and 
Officers of Clubs members thereof for the season of 1909: 

President, 

HARRY C. PULLIAM, 

Rooms 1424-1426 St. James Building, New York City. 

Telephone, 2209 Madison (Long Distance). 

Secretary-Treasurer. 

JOHN A. HEYDLER, 

(Address as above.) 

Board of Directors, 
Barney Dreyfuss, Chari.es TT. Ebbets, 

August Herrmann, Charles W. Murmiy, 

George B. Dovey, 

BOSTON NATIONAL LEAGUE BASE BALL 
COMPANY. 

in8 Paddock Building. 

GEORGE B. DOVEY, President and Treasurer. 

JOHN S. C. DOVEY, Secretary. 

THE BROOKLYN BALL CLUB, 
Washington Park, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
CHARLES H. EBBETS, President. 

HENRY \V. M KIM CCS, Treasurer. 

C. H. EBBETS, JR., Secretary. 



67 

CINCINNATI EXHIBITION COMPANY, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 

AUGUST HERRMANN, President, Wiggins Block 

MAX C. FLEISCHMANNj Secretary and Treasurer. 

CHICAGO LEAGUE BALL CLUB, 

Chicago, III. 

CHARLES W. MURPHY, 1 'resident. 

Corn Exchange Bank Building. 

CHARLES G. WILLIAMS. Secretary and Treasurer. 

CHARLES H. THOMAS. Associate Secretary. 

PITTSBURG ATHLETIC COMPANY, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

BARNEY DREYFUSS, President 

W. H. LOCKE, Secretary. 

903 Farmers' Bank Building. 

PHILADELPHIA BALL COMPANY, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

ISRAEL \V. DURHAM, Pi 

JAMES P. McNICHOL, \ dent 

CHARLES F. WAGNER, Secretary-Treasurer. 

WILLIAM J. SHK'I I SLIM-:, Business Manager. 

NATIONAL EXHIBITION COMPANY, 

W\v York. 

JOHN T. BRUSH, President 

FRED M. KNOWLES, Secretary-Treasurer. 

Room 623 St. James Building. 

AMERICAN BASE PALL AND ATHLETIC EXHI- 
r.ll [ON COMPANY OF ST. LOUIS, MO. 

M. S. ROBIS< i.\. I nrer. 



68 



Club Lists of Players 

Who Participated in the National League Championship 
Campaign of 1908. 



BOSTON. 
Manager — Joseph J. Kelley. 
Pitchers — Irving M. Young, Frank l'fet'fer, Thos. 
McCarthy, Harley E. Young, V. A. Lindaman, Ant;. 
Dorner, P. J. Flaherty, Geo. C. Ferguson, J. J. Boultes, 
Thos. Tuckey, W. H. Chappelle, Mahoney, A. A. Mattern. 
Catchers — James C. Ball, F. Bowerman, Harry Smith. 
Geo. F. Graham. Inlielders— -Dan McGann, C. Ritchey, 
Wm. Dahlen, \V. J. Sweeney, John J. Hannifin, Fred B. 
Stem, W. W. Thomas. Outfielders John Bates, Geo. 
Browne, C. Beaumont, Joe Kelley, Beali Becker, Herbert 
Moran. 

BROOKLYN. 

Manager— P. J. Donovaa 
Pitchers— H. Mclntire, I. K. Wilhelm, N. Rucker, J. 
W. Pastorius. Geo. G. Bell, J. S. Holmes, V Kruger, P. 
Finlayson. Catchers— Wm. Bergen, Louis Ritter, A. J. 
Farmer, Joseph Dunn. Infielders— Henry Pattee, T. J. 
Jordan, Chas. A. Alpcrniann, Philip Lewis. '111"-. P. 
Sheehan, Thos. 1). McMillan. S. Murch. Outfieldei 
Wm. Maloney, H. Lumley, John K. Hummel, A. W. Burch, 
Thos. Catterson. 

CHICAGO. 

Manager — Frank Chance. 
Pitchers — Carl Lundgren, Orval Overall, Mordecai 
Brown, Ed Reulbach, Jack Pfi< ter, ('. C. Fraser, Wm. 
F. Mack, Sponsberg, Floyd M. Kroh, Andrew Coakley. 
Catchers— John Kling, !'. J Moran, W. K. Marshall, A. 
V. Campbell. Inlielders — Frank Chance, H. Zimmerman, 
Harry Stein feldt, John J. EverS, Joe linker, Arthur Hof- 



69 

mail, (km. Howard Outfielders — James Single, James 
Sheckard, Frank Schulte, John F. Hayden, Blaine Durbin. 

CINCINNATI. 
Manager — John Gan/el. 
Pitchers — Tims. MeCartliy, Hob I'.w ing, Wm. J. Camp- 
l\. Spade, John A. Dubuc, John S. Doscher, J. P. 
\.,1/. J. A. Rowan, .Martin OToole, K. A. Savidge, H. 
S. Sincock, Win. L. Tozer, Jake Weimer, Andrew Coak- 
ley, Chas. Rhodes. Catchers— Geo. Schlei, John B. Mc- 
Lean. W. C. Pearce, Jr. [nfielders— M. II. Muggins, John 
Lobert, John Ganzel, 11. II. Mowrey, R. E. Hulswitt, R. C. 
Hoblitzell, K. J. Egan, David L. Brain. Outfielders— M. 
R Mitchell, Geo. II. Paskert, John F. Kane, Robert J. 
Coulson, I. F. Daley, R. II. Bescher, Harry Bayless, Wm. 
A. McGilvray. 

NEW ¥ORK 
Manager — John J. McGraw. 
Pitchers— R. W. Marquard, Louis Durham. Roy Beecher, 
1 iiu topher Mathewson, Leon Ames, Geo. R. Wiltse, 
Luther Taylor. Joe McGinnity, W. J. Malarkey, Oti 
F. C. Snodgrass, Arthur E. Wilson, 
Roger Bresnahan, Thos. Needham. tnfielders— John J. 
Hannifin, David L. Brain, S. Strang. Fred Tenney, 
Arthur Devlin, Lawrence Doyle, \. II. Bridwell, F. C. 
Merkle, C. L. Herzog. Outfielders H. E. McCormick, 
John C. Barry, Josh De Vore, Louis Evans, Wm. P. Shan- 
non, M. J, Donlin, J. B. Seymour. 



PHILADELPHIA. 

Manager — William J. Murray. 

Pitchers— Geo. McQuillan, L. II. Moren, Chas. E. 

m. T. Frank Sparks, Lewis Richie, Win. A. Foxen, 

Frank Corridon, II. Coveleskie, Earl Moore, II. K. I loch. 

Catchers — Chas. S. Dooin. F. Jacklitsch. [nfielders— Otto 



70 

Knabe. Ed. Grant, W. Bransfield, M. J. Doolan„ E. E. 
Courtney, Wm. Glcason, David Shean. Outfielders — John 
Titus, S. Magee, W. Osborn, Waller Clement, Charles 
Johnson, Roy Thomas, 11. I 7 .. McCormick. 

PITTSBURG. 

Manager — Fred C. Clarke. 
Pitchers — H. E. Young, Thos. McCarthy, II. S. Camnitz, 
S. Leever, C. Phillippe, A. P. Leifield, N. Maddox, Victor 
Willis, Irving Young. R. S. Vail, C. M. Brandom, II. 
Hillebrand. Catchers — Geo. Gibson, Ed. Phelps, P. O'Con- 
nor, John Sullivan. Infielders — Thos. Leach, John Wag- 
ner, Ed. Abbaticchio, Chas. W. Starr, Alan Storke, W. I). 
Gill, Jas. J. Kane, II. Swacina. Outfielders I Becker, 

D. E. Moeller, Roy Thomas, Fred Clarke, J. O. Wilson, 
W. P. Shannon, Royal Shaw, Cecil Neighbors. 

ST. LOUIS. 
Manager— J. J. McCloskey. 
Pitchers — Chas. A. Rhodes, i J. Gaiser, O. F. Bald- 
win, John C. Lush, Grant McGlynn, A. L. Raymond, Harry 
Sallee, F. L. Beebe, I. C. Higginbotham. Arthur Fromme, 
Ed. Karger. Catchers — A. Hostetter, Wm. Ludwig, John 
J. Bliss, Wm. Marshall. C. Moran. Infielders— Ed. 
Konetchy, Raymond Charles, R. Byrne, Win. (). Gilbert, 
Jos. L O'Rourkc, Thos, II. Reilly, J. W. Morris, C. 
Osteen. Outfielders— John C. Barry, W. I".. Murdock, Joe 
Delahanry, J. J. Murray, Albert Shaw, R. E. McLaurin. 

UMPIRES, 1908. 
R. D. Emslic, II. O'Day, J. ]•".. Johnstone, W. J. Klem. 
Charles Rigler, F. F. Rudderham, C. B. Owens. 



71 



Official National League Averages 



Clubs. 
Chii ago . . . . 
New York 
Pittsburg 
Philadelphia 
Cincinnati 

Boston 

Brooklyn . . . 
St. Louis .. 



STANDING OP CLUBS AT CLOSE OF SEASON. 

Chi. N.Y. Pitts, ri.il. Clu. BOS. Br. St.L. W. PC. 



11 



10 



Iti 



16 IS 



19 99 



.613 



12 


11 




13 


14 


1.1 


13 


20 


98 


.636 


13 


6 


:i 




12 


12 


17 


14 


83 


.539 


6 


8 


8 


io 




14 


16 


11 


73 


.474 


6 


6 


7 


11) 


8 




12 


11 


63 


.4118 


4 


8 


9 


5 


6 


10 




13 


53 


.344 


3 


s 


2 


S 


11 


8 


9 




49 


.318 


66 


56 


56 


71 


81 


91 


101 


105 







LOBt 

Postponed Games— At Boston, 5: all played, it Brooklyn, 5; all played. 
At New York. 7; all played. Ai Philadelphia, 10; all played. At cius- 
borg, 13; all played. At Cincinnati, 6; all played. At Chicago, 11; all 
played. At St. Urals, io; all played. 

Tie Games — At Boston. 1; played off. At Now York, 3; played off. 
At Philadelphia, i; played off. ai Chicago, l; played off. 

CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS IN PREVIOUS YEARS. 



is7i Athletics rr.ii 

1872 Boston 880 

is?:; Boston 7L'n 

1X71— Bos 717 

187B -Boston 898 

1878 Chicago 788 

1877— Boston 846 

1878— Boston 888 

1879 Providence 702 

1880 Chicag 798 

ism Chicago >;i;7 

1882 Chicag 6SS 

ins:; Boston 848 

iss i -Providence 780 

1885 Chicago 77n 

1886 Chicag 726 

1887— Detroit 687 

1888 Now York 841 

1888 Now York 889 

INDIVID UA 

Nanio and t'lllli. G. 

Wagner, Ptttsborg 161 

Donlln, Now Stork I i 

Doyle, Now Yoik 102 

Bransfleld, Pbilade la 148 

Brers, Chicago 

HerEOg, Now York 59 

Lobert, Cincinnati 156 

Zimmerman, Chicago 

Titos, Philadelphia 148 

Brldwell, New York 117 

Mccormick, Phila.-New York... 7« 

Bfagee, Philadelphia 

Bresnahan, New York 

Murray, si. Loots 

Howard, Chicag 

St. -in. Boston 19 

Kitii^*. Chicago •- 12.". 

Graham. Boston 67 



1890 Brooklyn «I7 

is:. i Boston 680 

1892 Boston 880 



1893— Boston 
1894 Baltimore 
1895— Baltimore 
1896— Baltimore 



.Iill7 
,698 
.669 
,698 



ISO? Boston 796 

1898 Boston 685 

1899 Brooklyn ':nl > 

1900 Brooklyn 803 

1901 Pittsburg 647 

1902 Pittsburg 711 

1908 — PlttBborg 850 

[904 N'.ov ". orl 688 

1606 No« York 868 

1906 Chicago 705 

1907— Chicagi 704 



I, BATTINI 
















AB. 


B. 


II. 


TI! 


2B.3B.HR.SI1.SB. TC. 


668 


100 


201 


308 


39 


18 


1.1 


11 


68 


1114 


8! 


71 


IDS 


2.;.-. 


26 


13 


6 


2;; 


30 


.331 


377 


68 


in; 


If... 


16 


9 





2T, 


17 


808 


687 


;,:: 


i. ;.i 


288 


2.: 


7 


3 


16 


;i.i 


:ail 


lid 


83 


12:. 


166 


19 


6 





22 


36 


.300 


160 


IIS 


■ts 


58 


6 


2 





10 


HI 


.3(10 


670 


71 


167 


232 


17 


18 


4 


32 


17 


■'I'.'l 


US 


17 


33 


39 


4 


1 


.. 


4 


2 


.2:1:1 




78 


164 


191 


21 


5 


2 


21 


27 


.286 


467 


Ml 


133 


119 


11 


1 





88 


88 


.285 


271 


::i 


78 


100 


I.', 


3 





7 


e 


.285 




79 


111 


212 


30 


16 


2 


18 


1.1 


,3*8 




70 


127 


H'.l 


2;. 


3 


1 


21 


14 


.283 




■ :i 


1*7 


237 


19 


16 


7 


4 


48 


.282 




12 


8S 


104 


7 


:: 


1 


11 


11 


.278 


72 


9 


10 







1 





2 


1 


.278 


421 




117 


HI2 


88 


r. 


4 


13 


10 


276 




22 


59 


64 


6 








6 


4 


.274 



72 



INDIVIDUAL BATX1N6.- 

Name and Club. (;. .\B. R. 

Rltchey, Boston 120 421 44 

Chance. Chicago 126 452 65 

Beschor. Cincinnati 32 lit it; 

Uerkle, New York IS 41 6 

Seymour, New V.,rk 155 587 59 

Osbnrn, Philadelphia 152 555 62 

Beaumont. Boston 121 476 66 

Tinker, Cblcag 157 548 67 

Maddox, Pittsburg 36 94 9 

Clarke, Pittsburg ir,i 651 83 

Shaw, St. Louis 96 367 40 

P. Moran, Chicago 45 160 12 

Leacb, Pittsburg 152 583 93 

Kelley. Boston 82 : 

Bates. Boston 117 nr, is 

Murdock, St. L.uis is 62 5 

Tenney. New V.,rk ir.6 583 101 

Delehanty, St. Louis 138 499 37 

Hohlltzell, Cincinnati 32 114 8 

Devlin, New York 157 534 5S 

Storke. Pittsburg 56 202 20 

Thomas, Phlln. and Pittsburg.. 107 410 54 

Abbaticchlo, Pittsburg 114 500 43 

Qanzel, Cincinnati ins 388 32 

Konetchy, St. 1 is 154 r.r, tr. 

Dooin, Philadelphia 132 435 28 

Jordan, Brooklyn in; 516 tl 

Sinitli, Boston 3.s 130 la 

Uoren, Philadelphia 28 49 5 

Grant, Philadelphia 147 598 69 

Sweeney, Boston 127 418 44 

Weimcr, Cincinnati If 45 7 

Burch, Brooklyn 116 466 45 

Ilofman, Chicago no 411 65 

I'askert. Cincinnati m; 395 40 

Becker, Pittsburg and Bolton.. 60 236 17 

Hummel, Brooklyn 154 694 61 

St.iufeklt. Chicago 150 539 63 

James Kan-. Pittsburg in 

R srge: SI LotcH 54 '4 

JfcGann, Boston no in f] 

Boston U1 m .,„ 

Hnggns, Cincinnati M 

McMillan, Brooklyn 43 117 9 

ScbuMe, Chicago , (K 386 42 

Wiltse, New } ork 44 110 9 

Doolan, Philadelphia m ,..:, g 

Phelps, Pittsburg -„ , , 

Reulbach, Chicago ' ~ lK il „, 

gostetter, St. Louis I ! !! " « ill 

Sheckard, Chicago m 4oi M 

I a) lor. New V.rk ;; 35 

QibSOn, Pittsburg " 140 486 37 

Browne, Boston ' n 8 c 1e V, 

tt, Cincinnati '..." "9 lu V, 

Bowerman, Boston 74 |!5 V. 

Wilson. Plttaburg ilj III „ 

I-l.leM. Pittsburg 34 7? I 

Bayless. Cincinnati " 19 7? 5 

GUI, Pittsburg ■' J5 7« ii 

MitchelL Cincinnati '.""119 4 m tl 

Slagle. Chicago ,' J°J " 

Crandall, New York ... 3' U f 2 *l 



(Continued. ) 












H. 


Til 
137 


IB 

10 


3B. 

3 


Ii: 


SI! 
21 


SP. 
7 


PC. 


115 


2 


273 


123 


161 


n 




2 


11 


37 


.272 


31 


46 


6 







2 


10 


.272 


11 


18 


2 




1 


2 





.268 


1 57 


199 


23 




5 


aa 


18 


.267 


US 


in 


19 


12 


2 


IS 


16 


.267 


127 


16b 


20 




2 


13 


13 


.267 


116 


214 


22 


14 


6 


29 


10 


.266 


25 


34 


3 







4 





.266 


116 


200 


18 


ir. 


! 


25 


24 


.265 


97 


121 


13 




1 


8 


9 


.261 


39 


46 


i 







8 


6 


.260 


It] 


222 


24 


16 


5 


M 


3 1 


.259 


69 


77 


8 




t 


6 


5 


.2.79 


115 


144 


11 




1 


11 


It 


.2-.S 


16 


l'j 


3 







1 


4 


:;.s 


149 


177 


20 




2 


a 


17 


.256 


127 


1H 


U 


It 


1 


it 


11 


.255 


29 


36 


a 







3 


2 


254 


135 


167 


18 




2 


19 


II 


.253 


M 


65 


5 




1 


8 


4 


.252 


103 


137 


11 


1" 


1 


8 


11 


331 


12i 


tea 


it 




1 


26 


22 


. 250 


97 


136 


16 


10 


1 


it 


6 


.250 


135 


193 


19 


12 


5 


25 


16 


.248 


m 


133 


17 







12 


3n 


.248 


127 


191 


18 




12 


11 


9 


.247 


32 


11 


2 




1 


4 


2 


.246 


12 


14 










2 





.245 


146 


175 


13 







It 


a 


.244 


102 


123 


15 







18 


17 


.244 


11 


12 


1 




■0 


2 


1 


.244 


111 


133 


8 




2 


11 


It 


.243 


100 


131 


It 




2 




It 


.242 


96 


121 


14 




I 


It 


3., 


.243 


67 


64 


3 







2 


9 


.242 


143 


190 


11 


ia 


4 


13 


20 


.241 


130 


165 


so 




1 


.•::■ 


12 


.241 


35 


44 


3 







'./ 


r. 


.211 


13 


U 


1 







I> 


1 


.211 


1H 


138 


8 


5 


2 


3" 


9 


.240 




161 


23 


2 


:; 


31 


10 




119 


113 


II 


6 





2'. 


3.0 


.239 


35 


38 


3 








1 


5 


.238 


91 


118 




2 


1 


3:, 


It 


.236 


26 


28 


2 








7 


1 


.236 


104 


143 


it 


4 


2 


u 


6 


.234 


15 


21 


2 


2 





1 


1 


.234 


23 


33 


e 


2 


" 


9 


1 


.232 


36 


a 


7 


1 





U 


1 


.232 


93 


123 


ik 


3 


2 


31 


is 


.231 


8 


8 











.-. 





.229 


111 


144 


u 


4 


2 


u 


4 




122 


147 


10 


6 


1 


it 


17 


.228 


88 


110 


1 


7 


1 


11 


7 


.228 


58 


71 


1 


1 


1 


4 


4 


.228 


120 


151 


■ 


7 


3 


u 


II 


.227 


17 


20 


1 


1 





1 


1 


237 


16 


20 


1 





1 


1 







17 


19 





1 





1 


1 


.224 


90 


114 


1 


6 


1 


11 


IS 


.229 


78 


84 


4 


1 





22 


17 


222 


16 


26 


4 


I 


2 


6 





.222 



73 



INDIVIDUAL BATTING. - 

Name and Club. G. AB. R. 

.lii.kliiwii. Philadelphia SO 86 G 

Schlet, Cincinnati 88 300 31 

Mowrey, Cincinnati 68 887 17 

Lewis, Brooklyn 116 U6 22 

Enabe, Philadelphia 161 

McLean, Cincinnati M 108 II 

Lumley, Brooklyn IU 1 1" 86 

Pattee, Brooklyn 74 864 U 

Swaclna, Pittsburg 50 170 7 

Shannon, N. S. -Pittsburg 106 884 14 

Bheehan, Brooklyn 146 468 45 

Gilbert, St. Louis 89 

John Kane, Cincinnati 12" 455 61 

Bliss, St Louis 18 

Barry, s>. I..-X. v 102 335 29 

Richie, Philadelphia 86 52 

Neednam. Mew York 47 91 8 

Brown, Chicago 44 131 

Egan, Cincinnati 18 68 1 

Marshall, St. Louis-Chicago.... 16 

Charles, si. Louts Ul 164 88 

Hannifin, New fork-Boston 80 IBS SO 

Mclntlre, Brooklyn 4" 100 

Alperman, Bi klyn 57 818 17 

St. Louis 89 112 8 

Maloney, Brooklyn 107 869 81 

O'Rourke, St. Louis 68 164 8 

Spade, Cincinnati 86 s 7 a 

Ames, Hew York 18 M 

Moeller, Pittsburg 27 108 11 

Hitler. Brooklyn 37 99 6 

St. Louis 136 188 

Cattergon, Brooklyn 18 

Raymond, si. Louis i< 80 8 

Starr, Pittsburg 

Ludwlg, St. Louis 88 1^7 16 

Courtney, Philadelphia 13 

McGinnity, New York 37 81 8 

Rucker, Brooklyn 12 117 8 

Dorner, Boston 38 67 4 

Morris, St. Loots 2:1 

1. Young, Boston-Pittsburg... 

Linda n Boston 18 

Bergen, Brooklyn 

C. Moran, St. Louis 16 68 

RelUy, St. Louts 29 81 5 

Dunn, Brooklyn 211 61 3 

1;. 11. Brooklyn 89 17 1 

Loth, si. Louis M 

Ferguson, ll.psl.iii 37 65 8 

Willis, Pittsburg 41 108 8 

Matbewson, Nen ^ ork 66 139 11 

McQuillan, Philadelphia 18 113 1 

ESwlng, Cincinnati 27 '•! 

Lundgren, Chicago 23 47 2 

I »er, Pittsburg 3* 81 

McCarthy, Cln.-Pltt».-Bos 17 41 I 

Boultes, Boston 17 

Flaherty, Boston 31 86 8 

l'i-. le, St. Loots 20 36 2 

I. ul Cincinnati U 

Hlgglnbntham, St. Louis 18 2* 8 

Orerall, Chlcag 37 70 3 



(Continued.) 












11. 


Tli. 


8B 3B.HB.SB.SB.PO. 


19 


22 


3 








4 


:: 


.221 


u 


88 


• ; 


1 


1 


13 


2 


.221) 


50 


61 


9 


1 





11 


r, 


.220 


01 


III 


", 


6 


1 


16 


9 


.219 


121 


163 


86 


8 


n 


12 


27 


.218 


67 


S7 


9 


4 


1 


8 


2 


.217 


90 


III 


13 


12 


4 


16 


4 


.216 


57 


66 


r, 


2 


n 


11 


24 


.216 


38 


16 


6 


1 





S 


4 


.216 




96 


2 


a 


1 


13 


18 


.215 


100 


122 


18 


2 





26 


9 


214 


69 


66 


7 








8 


6 


.2.1 


97 


131 


11 


7 


3 


::•; 


SO 


.213 


29 


26 


4 





1 


6 


3 


.211 


71 


84 


9 


2 


(i 


11 


10 


.31* 


11 


16 


2 


1 











.212 


19 


22 


3 








6 





.209 




2., 











5 


2 


.207 


14 


19 


3 


1 





6 


7 


.206 


V 








1 





1 





2i>6 


93 


116 


14 


3 


1 


20 


15 


.205 


: 


69 


6 


2 


2 


11 


7 


.205 


80 


2". 


3 


1 





1 





.200 


12 


SO 


3 


1 


1 


9 


2 


.197 


88 


86 


I 


.1 


11 


2 





.196 


7m 


98 


B 


7 


3 


It 


14 


.195 


Si 


I" 


I 


2 





8 


2 


It 


17 


19 





1 





3 





.195 


7 


7 











4 





.194 


L'I 


26 


3 


1 








4 


.193 


19 


23 


2 


1 





■> 





.192 


84 


93 


7 


1 


II 


2 1 


It 


191 


13 


19 


1 


1 


1 


2 


11 


.191 


17 


19 


2 


.1 


II 


3 





189 


II 


13 


9 


.1 


1) 


3 


6 


.186 


.11 


1.1 


2 


2 


11 


4 


3 


183 


S3 


32 


:: 


11 


II 


:. 


1 


.181 


11 


12 


1 








5 


1 


.180 


21 


23 





1 





1 


1 


.179 


12 


12 








II 







.179 




16 


1 


1 





4 


1 


.ITS 


11 


19 





1 





1 





.177 


16 


16 


1 





.1 


1 





.176 




1 , 


8 


2 







1 


.175 


II 


16 


1 


1 











.175 


II 


18 


1 





1 


.» 


4 


.173 


II 


1 1 


i 





11 


2 


'. 


173 


N 


II 


2 


■> 





5 


II 


,170 


16 


17 


2 








4 


1 


.169 


11 


11 


1 


1 





8 





169 


17 


18 


1 








4 





m 


80 




I 


2 


II 


7 





.155 


IX 


19 


1 








1 





l.-.l 


II 


17 


3 








4 


2 


.149 


7 


7 











5 





.149 


9 


11 





1 







1 


.148 


6 


7 


1 





II 


4 





.146 


3 


I 


'1 


.1 





4 


1 


113 


12 







2 





5 


2 


.140 


6 


5 











2 


■' 


.139 


1 




1 








2 





,138 


:. 


6 











1 





.132 


9 


12 


1 


1 





I 


1 


.129 



74 

INDIVIDUAL batting (Continued). 

Name and Club. ,:. ah. r. h. TB.2B.ZB.HB.SB.8B. PC. 

,lu »; Brooklyn 28 62 4 g ,„ „ , „ .. „ m 

Becbe. St. I is ■«, H 7901030 ;? 

Brain Cine atl-New Vorlc.... r. 72 6 9 9 ? ? us 

Eraser, Chicago 26 00 3 fi 7 1 o - 1 !™ 

ffiSg™- ,&£»*» S '" « » " ;; ;: 

I HI'MCl, ( 111* .llT'l , 33 7Q n n 1 ft /1 . . , . 

I?«n, Philadelphia ::::: '2 s 5 5 S } J 1 ; : 

SSX z A, p cSf ta n n!tr::::::::::: ;;:;!!;;: 
B^ft^ ■::::::::::: § B : j 

m" Hrkev V v"l " r ' 41 2 2 2 10 .019 

Malarkej, Hen York 15 6 1 .000 

.. , _ CLLB BATTING. 

Nam.- ami Club. c,. AB. It. II. TB. *B. SB. HE. SH. SB. PO. 

,•,','"',? " rk l r '7 M06 86] 1339 1667 182 43 20 250 181 

\! , t' W M« MS 1867 1688 1M H U WO 811 .249 

■ Ml 1 ?""> • ' ■'■ Ml 

V'.V „ ' a ' ISM IBM 184 68 11 2K! MM .244 

ShSl™.« ,: '" s WM l»7 48 17 194 134 .239 

iiiHinnatl lis 4879 488 14 814 198 .227 

',,'• i',"" 1 * L«4 87 IT 184 LEO .223 

' MJ " 164 4897 871 1044 1868 110 80 88 168 (18 213 

bar? !,V.'-"v '",'''"'"'''., '"!"."■, N "" S"*- **: Cincinnati. 47; Chicago, 

■rt.. 'i . ""• , : ""^"'"n.l.i". 88; Bt Louis, 88; I!. klv, , 

DonHn mfj^v*, " y , '"'.'" S '""' N«» York. 13; 

uonlln, New \,,rk, 10; Tinker, I 

INDIVIDUAL FIBLDtjjQ, 

flBST BASBIIXN. 

NameandOIab. Q.PO. A. B. TC.PC. Name and Clnb. O. PO. A. B. TC.PC. 

s.'!. 1 ,;, 'ii; H 2 'i 7 ° *" 100 ° Bransneld, Ph. 148 14TS hj 22 1588 .988 

t'i ill ■•' A' 

vr','- fman, Ch., 27 357 20 11 :: 

Koieteh^Sl , ,' M l7 '' ' ''•• >■■> 1«« B 8 1 

ivoneuny, h.L. 164 088 



Kmilif, Ph., 
Lb'tlechio.Pi., 
Rltchey, Bo., 
Hannifln, Bo 
Pattee, Mr., 
Hummel, Br., 
Brers, Ch., 
Iluggina, CI., 



Devlin, n.y. 
Stelnfeldt.Ch. 
Leach, PI 

Uowrey, (*i., 

Bheehan Br.. 
Brant, Ph., 



151 
111 
120 
22 
74 
43 
122 
135 



167 

56 
146 

134 



SECOND BASEUBN. 

844 470 88 SM .969 Qllbert S I. 

268 423 22 718 

I 71? 987 Doyle N V 

58 246 15 419 .964 Zlmmerman.Ch. 

105 127 9 241 .90?. Charles, S I. 
237 361 I llensog. N.V.', 

302 406 80 i c an ci . 



61 no n 

197 271 ;:, 



THIRD BASEMEN. 



Bo., 

■ mlflr Bo 
rne. S.L., 
Ci., 
. I'll.. 
8.L., 



M 


222 2r,4 84 


500 


981 


22 








111 






986 


a 


74 110 13 


r.17 


984 




11 18 7 




988 


88 










f.i 12:> i>; 




981 




35 47 111 




891 


ia 


171 277 54 




M 






141 


■,-., 


188 








81 


121 1M 88 






22 






911 


n 


35 45 8 


88 


•'.19 



75 



INI II VI III A I. I 'IELDING— (Continued). 
SHOETETOP8. 
Name and Club. G PO. 4. B. TC.PC. Name and Clab. 8. 



Tinker, C.b., 
IJahlec ' 
\\ agncr, l'l., 
Lewis, lir.. 
Doolan, I'll.. 
MurriK. S.I.., 
Hulawltt. CL, 



ir.7 

144 
IU 

in; 
in 

23 
118 



311 570 3U 

281 r.f.3 13 

227 352 :i,', 

268 119 IE 

17 7.', s 

■ ■ . ' 



Bridwcll, N.V. 
Utbert, CI., 

'hail... S.I... 

McMillan, Br., 
Bellly, s.l... 
O'Boorke, s.l,. 
s.l.., 



I'd. A. B, IT. PC. 

is .933 

ill 81 12 mi .1121 

. 9 . IS hit .him 

;.2 86 2" 158 s72. 



31 69 1(1 llli 
Ml 171 II 
30 42 13 



sen 

880 



Bencher. CI., 
N.Y., 

Buret], llr.. 

Del'h'ty. s.l... 

Donlln, N.J .. 
on, Ur., 

Chirk.-, PI.. 

Hummel, Br., 



Shannon, N1 PL H 



82 
27 
91 

12 
39 

98 



1.K1T FIELDERS. 

84 I I Hagee, Ph., 

ii 27 1' Paakert, CI., 

mi .i's" Slagle, ih.. 



15 10 
18 5 
4 3 



'■77 Sheekard, Cb., 



Bati -. Bo 
Brain, CI., 
K.-ll.-y. Bo., 
bobert, ci.. 
MVr'k.XY-l 



112 
77 
2n 
lir, 
101 
16 



271. IB | 

171 10 7 
2 






21 



201 12 iii 

Is7, l: 

7. 7, 

2 3 

3 8 



2.; 
71 
27 
l'l 



81 .9S8 
102 .922 



EB FIELDERS. 



Slagle, Ob., 
Kane, CI.. 



77, 117 

12H 2H2 



Thomaa.Ph.-Pl. 107 2s2 



Browne, Bo 

in.. 
I'll.. 
Beaumont, Bo. 
Howard, ' ii.. 



Itliyl.'MS, CI., 

Hcbulte, i'li.. 

llr. Mill,. N.TI .. 

Howard, Cb., 
Tltna, I'h.. 
Barry, si.. NY. 
Mitchell, CI., 

. Pl.-Bo. 



17 



I 7 

1 1 

7 2 

146 312 11 12 

I 

30 7,2 1 2 65 .964 



sn 



mi :i7i 



I. PI., 
Hofraan, Cb . 
Wilson. PI., 

Mill J. Hi-., 

l-a i ert, CI.. 
s,-\ in. .in-, N.Y. 
Shaw, si... 

Murray, S.l... 



2 3 
9 < 

3 3 
II 12 

r, i 

is in 

n la 



MS 



217 
I 

171 
113 



951 
949 

911 



BIGHT FIELD) 

17 23 5 SS I'"" I'.iir.-li. llr.. 
sfl lis 

127 197 : ' Vn I. mill. v. 111'.. 

r.i 77 '.i 3 89 '»:''• Shannon. NY 

119 215 22 9 ■ il ■■ II. -r. PI.. 

79 IIS I" 5 i: .Mi-. 11,,.. 

US iss is 9 ' irray, S.L. 

,12 3 70 .97,7 Shaw. S.l ., 



27 7,7 !(• 

116 17,7 13 8 1. 

1. 21 IS 12 14 

22 tt I. 2 10 

109 1S6 16 12 I) 



22 



91 II li ir 

I II 9U2 



CATCHERS. 
Hum and dob, O. PO. k, 

nils* si. Looia U KM 

klyn ... 99 

Breanaban, New York 139 

Chic IK» ■■■ H7 

Pittahurg 
Jacklltich, Philadelphia, . SO 

Secilhani, No i York 47 

Sinllli i 

i. 1'lttnhurg IM 

Bowerman, Boaton 
I- Moral Chicago 

II 

McLean, Cincinnati 69 

S.-hl.-l. Cincinnati "• 

llltl.T. 37 

Brooklyn 

Cnitni.ii 

l.udwlg, Si. Lonla 

Hnetetter. St, Loul II 



IS 

i.; 

2 
4 
S 
5 

'' 

ID 
N 
II 
is 

7 

I 
IS 
IS 
13 

9 



TC. 

611 

761 
s.l 

sos 

7.11 

771 

|s:l 
ill 



Pit. 

7 
17 
4 
3 
4 
', 
I 
4 
3 
8 

13 
3 

4 
S 
8 
S 



I 



76 



Club. G. PO. A. E TC PB. PC, 

158 1292 2031 205 6548 12 .MO 

Pittsburg 155 4201 1907 288 6334 8 .954 

Phils., ir>."i 4151 2071 238 34M It .968 

New V.irk, 157 1220 -joso 25o li.v.i; 22 .91:2 



CLUB FIELDING. 



Club. Q, PO A. E.TC PB PC 

Boston, 158 4167 2225 253 6835 10 962 

Brooklyn 151 4"75 2044 -jit 6886 13 .963 

Cincinnati, 155 4088 !9ls 255 6258 HI .'.(59 

St. Louis. 154 4039 2059 348 8446 24 .946 



PITCHERS' RECORDS. 

Record "f those who pitched In fifteen ot more games, arranged 
lug to percentage .,r rietories: 

, „, Field, ii. n. St. w. e. T. Sh. 

Name and Club. G.PO. A. 10. Tr. PC is. is. o. ]•. i. q, <, \y 

Renlbach, Chicago .. 16 15 77 7 88 .928 12 106 133 5 1 1 6 24 

Uathewson, \. \. ....,; rim 2 170 .988 3 42 258 3 3 1 12 37 

Brown, Chicago .... 11 38 73 108 l.OOO 5 49 122 6 5 S 29 

Maddox, Pittsburg... 86 8 77 3 88 .966 11 no 70 4 2 4 23 

Leever, Pittsburg.... 38 8 44 2 54 .968 8 II 28 8 2 4 15 

Willis, Pittsburg.... 11 11 S7 1 99 .990 6 89 97 4 3 1 7 23 

Camnitz, Pittsburg... 38 7 84 8 77 .922 5 69 118 2 1 3 16 

Ames, .Now York IS 5 32 3 40 .92", 1 27 SI 2 7 

McCarthy, Ci.-Pg.-Bo. 17 1 36 1 11 .976 1 27 31 1 2 7 

Wilis,., New York... 11 2:. 89 2 116 .9S3 9 73 11s 4 4 1 7 23 

Taylor, New York... 27 s 3.1 4 47 .915 4 31 50 4 1 1 s 

MeGinnity, N, Y ... 37 ill 50 5 85 .928 7 II 55 3 6 11 

Spado. Cincinnati ... 35 1 '.7 1; 1:7 .910 5 s.j 71 1 3 3 17 

Corrldon, Phils 27 13 7s 8 88 .943 6 48 50 I 1 8 2 11 

Overall, Chicago .... 37 13 51 6 69 .92s 2 78 i«7 6 2 1 4 ID 

McQuillan, Pliil.i. ... 18 14 98 1 116 848 6 91 114 5 3 7 31 

Prascr, Chicago 88 11 61 1 76 ,987 8 61 66 7 I 11 

Pfiester, Chicago .... 38 13 58 2 71 .972 11 70 117 r, 1 :: g u 

Welmer, Cincinnati.. 15 7 37 44 1.000 6 50 36 2 2 8 

Evting, Cincinnati.... 37 11 61 8 83 864 5 67 96 7 3 1 4 17 

LelSeld, Pittsburg... 34 8 62 5 7:; .939 12 B4 -7 :: :: 11 5 15 

Philadelphia. 33 15 65 6 86 .930 8 51 85 4 2 16 

Crandall, New STork. 22 15 51 1 88 885 8 59 77 2 8 12 

•11. Boston ... 27 9 16 8 80 .900 8 si 98 8 1 

Foxen, Philadelphia 22 9 51 3 63 .952 8 61 52 s t 2 7 

Campbell, Cincinnati. 35 10 s; 7 104 831 10 44 72 2102 12 

Rucker, Brooklyn.. . 42 13 107 1 124 868 19 116 198 S 1 8 17 

Moren, Philadelphia.. 28 I 81 2 49 72 8 0048 

IMibuc. ciiiciuunii .. Hi ; ■_•■, 2 10015 

Undainan, Boston II 8 68 2 79 .575 10 70 68 7 3 1 2 II 

" dlo-lin. Bl klyn... 42 17 109 6 112 ,956 6 83 99 5 3 6 16 

Richie, Philadelphia. 25 7 1 ,1 it -3311 7 

Flaherty, Boston ... 31 20 jj 81 S 11 1 12 

. xoung, Bo.-Pg.... 32 10 12 7 r,9 ,881 7 10 61 3 2 8 

11 1 11 .971; 56 88 4 1 1 6 

• 15 72 7 I ij M 8 5 3 11 

Raymond, St. U>ui« II 1210s 8 128 .938 14 95 145 9 3 5 15 

Boultes, Boston .... 17 7 17 24 1.000 1 8 28 1 3 

Coakley, CL-Ch 36 8 56 4 68 .941 4 70 68 1 2 6 10 

Mclntlre, Brooklyn.. 40 6 74 4 '1 „ 1 4 11 

St. Louis.... 22 10 ;:■; 14 110 14 

oorner, Boston 38 8 77 ; 41 2 1 3 3 

geebc, St. Louis.. , 4 66 72 5 

J'';'.""""-. 8t ; tjooto-. -" 180 o 2 5 

, ; "• , • '-"'" s • 1 '■■'■ •■•" ■■ -■■■ ■■■■ 8101 3 

Hlgginbotham, St. 1. It 2 ■. 71013 

:''"; Ll ;l , v ," ,' -•' 2 61 1 94 .981 2 45 63 4 2 4 

os Brooklyn. 2s ,1 86 1 71 871 7 74 9 2 4 

\ ■ l.rt '• v ">' s ■ "'' ' '' ' 2 17 23 1 

Malarkey, Now STork 15 1 9 1 11 2,09 1 10 12 1 

iimiM, 1 ' 1 ', °SSS~ yrl } t S ,,f N " u v " lk vs - PhUaoelphla, July 1, a. 

. Rucker 01 Brooklyn n. Boston, September 5. 



accord- 





Bat. 


L. 


PC. 


7 


.774 


11 


.771 


9 


.763 


8 


.742 


7 


.682 


11 


.676 


9 


.640 


4 


.636 


.4 


.636 


11 


.622 


8 


.615 


7 


.611 


12 


.586 


10 


: 


11 


.577 


17 


.575 


1 


.550 


10 


,645 


7 


.533 


II 


.531 


11 


.517 


16 


.516 


12 


.500 


11 


.500 


7 


.500 


11 


.480 


11 


.472 


1 


.171 


6 


.455 


It 


.129 


22 


.421 


10 


.112 


is 


.400 


12 




9 


.400 


IS 


.379 


2;, 




5 


.375 


is 


.357 


M 


.355 


9 


.308 


19 


.296 


u 


.278 


11 


.278 


8 


.273 


8 


.273 


15 


.211 


20 

6 


.167 
.113 


2 


.000 


U. 


(10 



<2 

■i. 



8 



Lju 

o 



8 



■A 

-J 
D 
Q 

UJ 

u 

en 

m 

D 
O 






_ 


CO 


*, 


<T> 


H 


-1 


I- 


3 


3* 


a? 




: J 


t4 

3 


X 

S 

*1 


- ■ 


a 

3 


£ 


hi 


S 


I 


"3 


*-\ 






THE SPALDING 

GUARANTEES 
>a QUALITY 



^TRADE-MARK 
>L»JNG| acce-pt no 

%~JZ& SUBSTITUTE.^' 



1909 



u6to Scam 
"fcflat!^. 



HMtvi ~^ 

. Official 
t.£cague>fr. i 



'/a/tonal . 
ociat/onjA 



e*^; 



^« 



ffKHf-Kx, 






IHferil 






tftockot 









t^<S>v^S 



ys J>avor/te\ 






? Wfe> / 



London 
England 



New York 
Bnllato 
Syraciw 



I Communications addressed to , 

A.'G. SPALDING & BROS. Yf^f 

in any of the following cities will receive attention L 

For atrept mimbra noe inside front tovr-r of this book 



Bosloa Philadelphia 
Plllsttnrg Washington 
Ctrvclanf Baltimore 



( hiragn 
Delroll 
ttlanla 



SI. Louis 
Denver 



(inrlnnall 
Kansas City 



Seattle | Mlmtapalls 



San Francisco 
New Orleans 
Montreal. fan. 



/'rice* \n effect January 5. 1W». Subject to change withuut iwtw 



THE SPALDING, 

GUARANTEES 1 
f> QUALITY 




TRADE-MARK j 

1 ACCEPT NO 

' SUBSTITUTE fy 



SPALDING OFFICIAL NATIONAL LEAGUE BALL 

The Official Ball of the game for over 30 years. 
Adopted by the National League in 1878 and 
the only ball used in championship games since 
that time. No. 1. Each, $1.25 Per dozen, $15.00 

SPALDING OFFICIAL NATIONAL LEAGUE JUNIOR 

In every respect same as our Official National League 
BaH No. 1, except slightly smaller in size. Especially 
designed for junior clubs (composed of boys under 16 
years of age) and all games in which this ball is used 
will be recognized as legal games. No.Bl. Each, $1.00 

Spalding Deuble Seam League Ball 
No. 0. Made with same care and 
of same material as our Official 
National League Ball. The double 
Beam is used in its construction, 
rendering itdoublysecu re against 
ripping. Each, $1.50 Doz.. $18.00 



Spalding National Association Ball 
No. NA. Made in exact accordance 
with the rules governing the 
National and American Leagues 
and all clubs under tlio National 
Agreement Ea..$1.00.Doz.,$12.00 

Spalding National Association Jr. 

No. B2. In every respect same as 
our National Association Ball 
No. NA, except slightly smaller 
in size Each, 75c. 

Spalding Public School League 
No. B3. A well mada junior size 
ball. Splendid fur general prac- 
tice by boys' teams. Each, 50c. 

Spalding King 0! the Diamond 

No. 5. Full size, of good material, 
horsehido cover. . , Each, 25c. 

Spalding Junior Professional 

No. 7B. Slightly under regular 
size, horschide cover and very 
lively. Each, 25c. 

Spalding Boys Amateur Ball 

No. 11. Nearly regulation size and 

weight, the best ball for the 

money on the market; one dozen 

balls in a box. . . . Each, 10c. 



Spalding City League 

No. L4. Full Bizeand weight. Very 
well made and excellent for gen- 
eral practice. Ea., 75c. Doz.. $9.00 

Spalding Professional 

No. 2. Full size ball. Made of care- 
fully selected material and first- 
class quality. . . . Each, 50c 

Spalding Lively Bounder 

No. 10. Horsehide cover; the inside 
is all rubber, making it the live- 
liest ball ever offered at the 
price Each, 25c. 

Spalding Boys' Favorite 

No. 12. A good boys' lively ball; 
two-piece cover. Packed one 
dozen balls in a box. Each, 10c 

Spalding Rocket Ball 

No. 13. A good bounding ball; 
boys' size. One duzen balls in a 
box Each. 5c 



E>|l»d 



New York 

H11II.1I.. 
Syrarmf 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities will receive attention 

For st rrot numbora 
Philadelphia 



Hinliuryh 
Scotland 



Boslon 
Plltsbnrg 
Cleveland 



Washington 
llalliaorr 



id* front covrr of thi 

Chicago 



Drlrolt 
Atlanta 



SI. Louis 
Denver 

Seattle 



Cincinnati 

Kansas City 

Minneapolis 



San Francisco 

New Orleans 
Montreal, Can, 



i'net* \n cjftct January S, 1909. Subject to change without notice 



THE SPALDING^«&TRADE-MARK 

GUARANTEES •.oWl)! ACCEPT NO 
^ QUALITY \^#7 SUBSTITUTE C 



w^yk 




Why Spalding 
Uniforms Are Best 



BECAUSE we posmm a perfect tac- 
i tory equipment and for over thirty 
years we have been making Base Ball 
Clothing, accumulating during that 
time a superior knowledge of the re- 
quirements of the Base Ball Player, 
which knowledge, together with all 
the advantages of our superior factory 
facilities the purchaser receives the 
benefit of in every Spalding Uniform 
we make. All Spalding llnllorms consist 
ot Shirt. Pants, Cap, Belt and Stockings. 

The Spalding Uniform No. 0— Highest Grade Made 

Workmanship and material very highest quality throughout. Colors: Red 
Stripe, Green Stripe, Navy Blue Check, White, Blue Gray. Brown Gray, 
Dark Gray, Black, Green. Maroon, Navy Blue, Brown and Cardinal. 

The Spalding Uniform No. 0. . . Complete. $15.00 <t12')0 

Net price to clubs ordering for entire team. . Suit, vx««vv 

The University Uniform No. 1 

Equal to No. Uniform, but slightly lighter. Colors : Red Stripe, Green 

Stripe, Navy Blue Check, White, Blue Gray, Brown Gray, Dark Cray, 

Black, Green, Maroon, Navy Blue, Brown and Cardinal, 

The University Uniform No. 1. . . Complete. $12.50 Sill 11(1 
Net price to clubs ordering for entire team. . Suit, *P*"»"" 

The Interscholastic Uniform No. 2 

One of our most popular suits, and will give the best of satisfaction. 
Can usually be worn two seasons. Colors : White, Blue Gray. Brown Cray, 
Dark Gray, Black, Green. Maroon, Navy Blue, Brown and Cardinal. 

The Interscholastic Uniform No. 2. . Complete, $9.00 $7 Cft 
Net price to clubs ordering for entire team. . Suit, *'•'"' 

The Minor League Uniform No. M 

A very popular and satisfactory uniform. Well made of very durable 
material. Colors: Navy Blue, Blue Gray, Dark Gray and White. 

The Minor League Uniform No. M. . Complete, $9.00 «7 CA 
Net price to clubs ordering for entire tram. . Suit, wi.siv 

The City League Uniform No. P 
Good quality uniform, in neat and attractive checks, plaids and stripes. 
Finished like our best quality uniforms. Colors: Brown Check. White 
with Blue Check, Brownish Blue Shadow Plaid, Crayish Brown with Blue 
Stripe. Bluish Gray, Light Blue Plaid and Brown Slripo. 

The City League Uniform No. P. . . Complete, $7.50 «g QQ 



Net price to clubs ordering for entire team. . 



Suit, 



London 
England 



Communication- 



New York 

Bollalo 
Syracnse 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. l'"*^ 

in any of the following cities will receive attention I 

For street numberg aee inside front eovr of thin book 



Boston 
Plllsbnrg 
Cleveland 



Philadelphia 
Washington 
Baltimore 



Chicago 
Delrolt 

Atlanta 



SI. tools 
Denver 
Seallle 



Cincinnati 
Kansas City 

Mmiirapi.lls 



San Francisco 
New Orleans 
Montreal. tan 



tvicXM in <Jf*cl January 5. IWII. Subject to chanyc u.:thouL notice 



THE SPALDINGfc?&TRADE-MARK 

GUARANTEES I0P* l JJ.1b| ACCEPT NO 
-, QUALITY- %^^*f SUBSTITUTED 



MOv.fM'.t'l. ' 



The Club Special Uniform No. 3 

Well finished; a most excellent outfit for amateur clubs. Colors: White, 
Blue Gray, Brown Gray, Dark Cray, Maroon and Black. 

The Club Special Uniform No. 3. . . Complete, $6.00 «C AA 
Net price to clubs ordering for entire team. . . Suit, '"' vv 
The Amateur Special Uniform No. X 

Very popular with the younger base ball players. Colors : White, Light 
Gray, Blue Gray, Brown Gray. Maroon, Navy Blue. Green. 

The Amateur Special Unifurm No. 4. . Complete, $5.00 <M AA. 

Net price to clubs ordering for entire team. . . Suit, * 1,vv 
The Spalding Jnnior Uniform No. 5 
For boys and youths. Colors: Slate, Cardinal.NavyBluc, Blue Gray.Brown 

Mixed. The Spalding Junior Uniform No. 5. Complete, $4.00 JjjO AA 

Net price to clubs ordering tat '■> or mart uniform*. Suit, W' vv 
A'.. extra charge for U tti ring shirt* with nam* oj alub nor for Attachable 
sleeve* on/a Extra charge for nil littering on caps. 

The Spalding Youths' Uniform No. 6 
Very well made of good quality Gray material. . Complete, «i AA 
1 felt letter only on el I ra charge for all lettering on caps. v».«w 
Nolargi 80-in.waisl an.i::i-in. chestfurnishedinNo.6uniform. 

Meatun nu til. blank and complete assortment of sample* and prices free. 



Spalding Base Ball Coats 

Made of base 
ball flannel, 
trimmed with 
different c ol- 

oj ; OH 

euffaani 

e ta. La c b e 

pearl buttons 

on front. The 
\ work- 
in a na hi p 
throughout. 

In ordering state color of material 
and trimming desired. Ban 

and colors of ma- 
tt] o measurement blanks 
furnished on application. Noextra 

chance for diamond and one felt 
Size of dia- 
mond not over 6'A inches. 
To clubs purchasingwith uniforms 
amine or more coate at one time. 
Each. S'J.50. S'J.QU. $7.50, f5.no 




Separate Shirts and Pants 

Furnished at regular list 
prices with either button 
or lace front, lettered on 
front with name of club 

-i No. Gquality) and 
with detachable sleeves. 
Different color collar and 

no extra charge (ex- 
cept N os. 5 and equalities) 

SHIIITS 
No. The Spalding. . 
No. 1 University . . 
No. 2 Inlerseholaslic , 
No. 3 Club Special . . 

No. 1 Amateur Special 
No. 5 Junior .... 

PANTS 
No. The. Spalding. . 
No. 1 University . . 
No. 2 [nterscholastic . 

No. :i Club Special . . 
No. A Amateur Special 
No. 5 Junior .... 




London 
Ingbnd 



»<•» York ! Boston 
Bnllalo Plllsbirg 
S>racu>t [Ireland 



Communications addressed to 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

in any of the following cities Ittentf' 

Tor Ittrogt number* »«■<-■ in.irio front cover of tlii. hook 



I'lnl.inVllilm. 

Washington 
Battiniorr 



Chicago 
Prlroll 
lllssU 



SI. lonls 
Drnvtr 
s. .,iil.- 



i latl 

Kansas City 
jjjaaCTStjM 



San (ranclseo 
New Orleans 

Montreal, Ian 



ft 



J-i 



Subject to